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VIENNA

Five lesser-known tourist spots in Austria that you should visit

Whether you are exploring a new city or visiting a familiar one, seeking out sites off the beaten path can be a great way to add excitement to your travels. If you find yourself in Vienna this weekend, here are five hidden gems to explore.

Schmetterlinghaus 

Vienna’s Butterfly House occupies two levels of the Hofburg Palace. Just a short trip away from the city’s famous opera house, this greenhouse offers a different kind of music: the sound of 400 butterflies flying through their lush tropical environment while small waterfalls trickle in the background. Watching the butterflies can be relaxing on its own, but you can even get an even closer look by holding out an outstretched finger and allowing them to land on your hand. 

Lost Garden of Schloss Schönbrunn

The Irrgarten (Lost Garden) on the grounds of the glamorous Schönbrunn Palace is often overlooked in favour of the castle’s interior splendour. But this maze, which was rebuilt in 1999 according to the original design from 1686, can be a fun and challenging way to explore the park surrounding the former Habsburg palace.

Schloss Schönbrunn in Vienna.

Schloss Schönbrunn in Vienna. Look out for the ‘lost garden’ maze. Photo by Philipp Deus on Unsplash

Porgy and Bess Jazz Club:

Vienna is famous for its classical music, with the likes of Mozart and Beethoven once calling the city home. But that is not the only music on offer in the city: if you spend an evening at Porgy and Bess in the city centre,  you will be sure to catch some excellent jazz music. This weekend’s performers include two trios: Michael Wolff, Francois Moutin, and Jeff Bordeaux take the stage on Saturday while Sven Regener, Richard Pappik, and Ekki Busch will perform on Sunday. 

READ ALSO: Five beautiful hikes and destinations south of Vienna

Setagaya Park 

Tucked away in the north of the city centre in the Döbling district, this garden designed by Japanese landscape architect Ken Nakajima in 1992 brings elements of a traditional Japanese landscape to the city. Cherry and maple trees, densely planted gardens, and many streams, ponds, and fountains create a relaxing and beautiful atmosphere to spend the morning or afternoon. You can also grab a bite to eat at the teahouse in the park. With spring upon us, now is a particularly great time to visit as the weather warms up and the flowers begin to bloom. 

Brunnenmarkt 

Finally, you can’t go wrong by exploring some of Vienna’s outdoor markets, which can fly under the radar given there is so much else to see. Pay a visit to the Brunnenmarkt in the Ottakring district. It is Vienna’s biggest street market, featuring 170 stalls that stretch 948 meters, where you can grab food and search for clothes, household items, toys, and more. The market is also considered the city’s most diverse: you can get fresh fruits and vegetables, munch on Austrian or Turkish street food, or enjoy a meal at the nearby Turkish, Vietnamese, and Mediterranean restaurants. 

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AUSTRIAN CITIZENSHIP

Why is Vienna pushing hard for the easing of citizenship rules?

Authorities in the Austrian capital Vienna are campaigning hard for the federal government to change the bureaucratic process of naturalisation.

Why is Vienna pushing hard for the easing of citizenship rules?

The Vienna authorities and the city’s so-called Integration Council have recently strongly criticised the existing restrictive citizenship law, arguing that it creates a “democratic deficit” by excluding over one-third of Vienna’s resident population from the right to vote. In a press statement, they have called for reforms to address this issue.

While the citizenship law is under federal jurisdiction and cannot be changed by individual provinces, regional authorities can still exert pressure for reforms. Vienna has advocated for law changes for several years, especially as the city’s immigrant population continues to grow.

Naturalisation as an integration tool

The latest proposal from the Vienna Integration Council, led by Deputy Mayor Christoph Wiederkehr of the Neos party, suggested granting automatic citizenship to children born in Austria if one parent has legally resided in the country for five years.

According to the Integration Council, Vienna has experienced a significant decline in the naturalisation rate compared to other European countries, despite the population growth resulting from immigration. The current requirements for Austrian naturalisation include ten years of legal and uninterrupted residence, as well as proof of sufficient financial means and a secure livelihood.

READ ALSO: Reader question: Does Austria allow me to have multiple citizenships?

The Integration Council called for reducing the length of required residence, lowering income thresholds, and allowing dual citizenship. They also emphasised the need for increased resources for the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (MA 35) in Vienna to streamline and enhance the efficiency and transparency of the naturalisation process.

Additionally, the council highlighted the challenges the current citizenship law poses to the integration process. Gerd Valchars, a member of the Integration Council and a political scientist, said that naturalisation is vital in facilitating social integration, leading to higher incomes, lower unemployment rates, improved housing conditions, and better educational opportunities for children.

austria passport

Austria has strict rules on citizenship, but a powerful passport. (© Amanda Previdelli / The Local)

‘Democratic deficit’

It’s not the first time Vienna has mentioned an “increasing democratic deficit” in Austrian society. 

Already in its Integration Monitor 2020, the SPÖ-led administration said: “A democracy thrives on the participation of the largest possible number of people subject to the laws that are passed.

“But if people are not allowed to vote because of their citizenship or do not (any longer) make use of their right to vote (as it happens especially often with disadvantaged population groups1), this leads to the fact that their interests are no longer represented in parliament, state parliament, the municipal council or district council. This is a massive democratic deficit that has been growing in recent years due to increasing mobility and immigration.”

“The situation is exacerbated by the very restrictive naturalisation law in force in Austria, as described above. Not only does the representativeness and, thus, legitimacy of democracy suffer from this situation, but it also leads to an integration policy problem. This is because people who are not allowed to participate in decision-making may develop less interest in political processes and the development of the society in which they live”, it added.

BACKGROUND: What are Austria’s Social Democratic Party’s plans to ease citizenship rules?

The City has called for easing citizenship rules for almost 20 years, requesting that political participation rights be linked to residents after a certain stay.

In 2003, Stadt Wien introduced voting rights for third-country nationals at the district level, with prerequisites such as five years of legal residence and main residence in Vienna. However, this regulation was overturned by the Constitutional Court in 2004 because Austrian federal constitutional law only recognises a uniform right to vote at all levels of the federal state linked to Austrian citizenship.

READ ALSO: ANALYSIS: Could Austria ever change the rules to allow dual citizenship?

Who is prevented from voting in Vienna and Austria?

At the beginning of 2022, 31.5 percent of the population of voting age 16 and older were not allowed to vote in elections at the federal, provincial and municipal levels, according to Stadt Wien data.

According to the latest information, 14.18 percent of Viennese citizens of voting age are citizens of other EU member states and, therefore, eligible to vote at least at the district level.

However, 17.26 percent of Viennese citizens of voting age have the citizenship of a third country and are therefore not allowed to vote at any level.

In some districts, the proportions of people without voting rights are much higher. In Rudolfsheim-Fünfhaus, 42.4 percent of the population of voting age do not have the right to vote. In no other district is the proportion of Viennese who are allowed to participate in democratic processes lower. In contrast, in Hietzing, “only” 20.8 percent are excluded from democratic participation.

READ ALSO: Austrian presidential elections: Why 1.4 million people can’t vote

Young people with foreign citizenship are particularly affected by the exclusion from the right to vote: 41.4 percent of Viennese citizens between the ages of 16 and 44 do not have Austrian citizenship.

In Austria, the latest Statistik Austria data shows that 19 percent of all people residing in the country are not Austrian nationals – and, therefore, would not have the right to vote. The number has increased considerably since January 1st 2022, when 17.7 percent of the population had foreign citizenship. This considers people of all ages, and not only those of voting age (16 or above).

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