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WORKING IN AUSTRIA

EU takes action against Austria on working rights

Austria comes up short in areas such as 'transparent and predictable working conditions' and 'promotion of equality in the labour market', the EU Commission has said.

EU takes action against Austria on working rights
Photo by Parker Byrd on Unsplash

The EU Commission has reprimanded Austria on several labour market issues, according to a press statement by the Brussels-based authority.

Austria is lagging in properly implementing EU regulations in “transparent and predictable working conditions” and “promotion of equality in the labour market”.

After the European Union sends out directives to member states, it also sets a deadline for the countries to bring the EU-agreed rules to the national level.

READ ALSO: 10 ways EU countries aim to cut energy bills and avoid blackouts this winter

The first directive for “transparent and predictable working conditions” provides more extensive and updated labour rights and protection to the 182 million workers in the European Union.

The EU Commission stated: “With the new rules, workers have, for instance, the right to more predictability regarding assignments and working time. They will also have the right to receive timely and more complete information about the essential aspects of their job, such as place of work and remuneration”.

Austria and 18 other member states have failed to communicate the complete transposition of the directive into national law by the deadline of August 1st.

READ ALSO: 10 ways EU countries aim to cut energy bills and avoid blackouts this winter

Promotion of equality in the labour market

Additionally, Austria has failed to notify national measures transposing the “Work-Life Balance Directive” by the EU and has been notified along with 18 other countries.

The directive “aims to ensure equality in labour market participation by encouraging equal sharing of care responsibilities between parents”.

“It introduced paternity leave, ensuring that fathers/second parents have the right to take at least ten working days of paternity leave around the time of birth of the child. The Directive also establishes a minimum of four months of parental leave, with at least two of the four months non-transferable from one parent to another.

READ ALSO: Non-EU family members of EU citizens can obtain long-term residence, court rules

“It establishes five working days per year of carers’ leave for each worker providing personal care or support to a relative or person living in the same household and gives all working parents of children up to at least eight years old and all carers a right to request flexible working arrangements.”

The Austrian federal government now has two months to respond to the EU Commission’s letter of formal notice, otherwise, it faces another warning – and could eventually see its case going to the European Court of Justice.

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WORKING IN AUSTRIA

Find out the Austrian public holidays in 2023

As 2022 comes to a close, it's time to prepare for the public holidays in Austria in 2023. The good news is that the Alpine country has plenty of them.

Find out the Austrian public holidays in 2023

Austria has plenty of official holidays (13 federal ones every year) when people get the days off from work and schools (and shops!) close. 

So much so that even if there are only a few days left in the year, Austrians will still get to enjoy Christmas Day as a holiday on December 25th (though it falls on a Sunday) and St Stephen’s Day, on December 26th, the following Monday.

READ ALSO: Reader question: What happens in Austria when a holiday falls on a weekend?

Here are the national public holidays you can enjoy as an Austrian resident in 2023 (don’t forget to stock up on groceries as supermarkets will be closed on these days as well as on Sundays):

January

  • January 1st, New Year’s Day (Neujahr), will fall on a Sunday
  • January 6th, Three King’s Day (Heilige Drei König), will fall on a Friday

February

There are no official national holidays in February.

READ ALSO: Why everything in Austria is closed on Sundays – and what to do instead

March

There are no official national holidays in March. However, Carinthia, Styria, Tirol and Vorarlberg celebrate St. Josef’s Day on March 3rd. Schools and stores may be closed.

April

  • April 10th, Easter Monday (Ostermontag), always falls on a Monday

May

  • May 1st, Labour Day (Staatsfeiertag), will fall on a Monday
  • May 18th, Ascension Day (Christi Himmelfahrt), always falls on a Thursday
  • May 29th, Whit Monday (Pfingstmontag), always falls on a Monday

Additionally, Upper Austria celebrates St. Florian’s Day on May 4th, so schools and stores may be closed.

June

  • June 8th, Corpus Christi (Fronleichnam), always falls on a Thursday

July

There are no official national holidays in July – though summer vacations start this month.

August

  • August 15th, Assumption of Mary (Mariä Himmelfahrt), will fall on a Tuesday

September

There are no official national holidays in September. However, Salzburg celebrates St Rupert’s Day on September 24th, so schools and stores might be closed.

October

  • October 26th, National Day (Nationalfeiertag), will fall on a Thursday

Additionally, Carinthia celebrates “Vote Day” or “Referendum Day” on October 10th. Schools and stores might be closed.

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: What is the Austrian National Day and how is it celebrated?

November

  • November 1st, All Saints’Day (Allerheiligen), will fall on a Wednesday

Additionally, Burgenland celebrates St Martin’s Day on November 11th, while Vienna and Lower Austria celebrate St Leopold’s Day on November 15th. Schools and stores might be closed.

December

  • December 8th, Feast of the Immaculate Conception (Mariä Empfängnis), will fall on a Friday
  • December 25th, Christmas Day (Christtag), will fall on a Monday
  • December 26th, St Stephen’s Day (Stefanitag), will fall on a Tuesday
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