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Job advert: The Local Germany is looking to recruit a new journalist

If you'd be interested in joining our team at The Local to help explain Germany to a growing audience of subscribers then read on.

Aerial view of Berlin from the Berliner Dom cathedral.
Aerial view of Berlin from the Berliner Dom cathedral. Photo: Robert Keane

The Local seeks a reporter in Germany  

The Local is currently seeking a reporter in Berlin to join our growing team of internationally minded, driven and clued-up journalists.  

As a reporter, you will work closely with your country editor to build membership of The Local Germany and reach new audiences.

You will cover the relevant news about Germany as well as explain to our readers how this news affects their lives. You will also write articles to explain the practical info our readers need for living in Germany and write features to help them get to grips with the German language, the people and the culture.

You will seek out the issues and subjects that matter to our readers as foreign residents in Germany and help provide them with answers or explanations.

You will also be part of a vibrant team stretching from Sweden to Spain, working together to grow membership across The Local and increase its profile among an international audience.

The Local currently has over 50,000 members of which around 6,000 are signed up to our German site.

What we expect from you:  

  • An exceptional level of written and spoken English (native speaker or equivalent).  
  • Fluency in German: Our ideal candidate has been living in Germany for more than a year.  
  • The ability to write clear, concise and engaging news stories, explainers and practical features.  
  • The ability to dig out stories that matter to readers and build contacts with groups and associations representing foreign nationals.
  • Experience of translating from German to English and an ability to turn flowing German prose into equally flowing English prose.  
  • At least two years’ experience in an editorial role.  
  • A knowledge of journalistic ethics and good practice.  
  • An excellent knowledge of German society, politics and institutions. 
  • Flexibility: the ability to work some unsocial hours as needed, sometimes at short notice.  
  • Excellent interpersonal skills.  
  • Familiarity with using social media.  
  • Familiarity with blogging, online publishing, sound recording and photo editing are an advantage.  
  • A knowledge of other languages apart from English and German (particularly French, Italian and Spanish) would be useful.  

This is you:  

  • Curiosity: you want to help explain Germany to our readers and dig deep to find out how the country works.
  • Selfless: You want to do what it takes to explore issues our readers are having living in Germany and get the answers they need
  • Imagination: you’re constantly thinking of new ways to approach stories, new ways to use online and social media, new ways to connect with our audiences.  
  • Intelligence: you have a sophisticated approach to news and info that will help The  Local in Germany broaden its readership while retaining loyal existing readers.
  • Diligence: You are prepared to go the extra length to make your articles as valuable as possible

All applicants must have the right to live and work in Germany. The Local cannot sponsor work visa applications.

Making a commitment to our team will give you the chance to pursue an exciting, international journalism career. The job is full time and is permanent (CDI contract). Pay competitive.  

If you think you have what it takes, send your CV and a brief introduction (in English) to [email protected], with the subject line Reporter position, The Local Germany  

The Local is an English-language online news network, with sites in nine countries used by more than 5 million people each month and 50,000 paying members.

With an entertaining blend of daily news, features and practical info, our sites have become  essential reading for foreign citizens.

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For members

IMMIGRATION

EXPLAINED: How Germany plans to make immigration easier for skilled workers

The German government has agreed on a set of reforms for the immigration of skilled workers, which was approved by the cabinet on Wednesday. Here's what they're planning.

EXPLAINED: How Germany plans to make immigration easier for skilled workers

What’s happening?

Germany is currently facing a dramatic skilled worker shortage, particularly in the health sector, IT, construction, architecture, engineering and building services. The German government currently expects that, by 2026, there will be 240,000 jobs for which there will be no qualified candidates.

In order to help plug the gap in the labour market, the coalition government has been proposing changes to immigration law for months.

In September, Labour Minister Hubertus Heil presented plans for a new points-based immigration system, that will enable non-EU workers to come to Germany to look for work even without a job offer, as long as they fulfil certain criteria, under a so-called “Opportunity Card” (Chancenkarte) scheme.

READ ALSO: Explained: How to apply for Germany’s new ‘opportunity card’ and other visas for job seekers

Now, the coalition government has agreed on a wide-ranging set of initiatives to help remove hurdles for skilled workers coming to Germany. The points were approved by the cabinet on Wednesday, who should then come up with a draft law in the first quarter of 2023.

What’s in the plans?

The central aim of the government’s plans is to make it easier for people from outside the EU to find a job in Germany.

In the draft paper, ministers distinguish between three so-called pillars, the first of which concerns the requirements that foreign specialists must meet in order to be allowed to work in Germany.

Until now, they have had to have a recognized degree and an employment contract, but the government wants to lower this hurdle.

The draft states: “For specialists who are unable to present documents relating to their professional qualifications or can only do so in part, for reasons for which they themselves are not responsible, an entry and residence option should nevertheless be created.” The competencies could then be finally examined once they have arrived in Germany.

A trainee electrician practices in a training centre in Cologne. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Oliver Berg

The second pillar involves skilled workers from abroad who do not yet have a degree but already have a lot of professional experience.

For employees in the information and communications technology sector, the requirement of having sufficient German language skills would be waived, and it would then be up to the managers of the company making the job offer to decide whether or not they want to employ the skilled worker despite a lack of German language skills. 

READ ALSO: ‘More jobs in English’: How Germany could attract international workers

The third pillar is about enabling third-country nationals with good potential to stay in Germany in order to find a job. The “Opportunity Card” falls under this pillar and will involve a new points-based system, which will allow non-EU nationals to come to Germany to look for work even without a job offer as long as they fulfil at least three of the criteria of having a degree or professional qualification, having experience of at least three years, having a language skill or previous residence in Germany and are under 35.

READ ALSO: How to apply for Germany’s new opportunity card and other visas for job seekers

What other initiatives do the plans include?

The traffic light coalition also wants to do more to promote Germany as an attractive, innovative and diverse country abroad.

One initiative is to publicise job vacancies internationally and connect qualified people abroad with employers and educational institutions in Germany. 

READ ALSO: Will immigration reform be enough to combat Germany’s worker shortage?

The “Make it in Germany” portal, which has its own job exchange, will be expanded and further developed.

The government also wants to promote the German language both abroad and at home for example, by expanding digital language courses and exams.

The government also wants to simplify and accelerate the recognition procedures for foreign vocational qualifications. One of the planned measures is that the required documents can also be accepted in English or in the original language.

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