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‘We agree to disagree’: Still no progress in marathon SAS strike talks

By lunchtime on Friday, talks between the Scandinavian airline SAS and unions representing striking pilots were still stuck on "difficult issues".

Pictured is an SAS aircraft.
An SAS plane approaches Arlanda airport, north of Stockholm File Photo by Jonathan Nackstrand / AFP.

“We agree that we disagree,” Roger Klokset, from the Norwegian pilots’ union, said at lunchtime outside the headquarters of the Confederation of Swedish Enterprise in Stockholm, where talks are taking place. “We are still working to find a solution, and so long as there is still some point in continuing negotiations, we will do that.” 

Mats Ruland, a mediator for the Norwegian government, said that there were “still several difficult issues which need to be solved”. 

At 1pm on Friday, the two sides took a short break from the talks for lunch, after starting at 9am. On Thursday, they negotiated for 15 hours, breaking off at 1am on Friday morning. 

READ ALSO: What’s the latest on the SAS plane strike?

Marianne Hernæs, SAS’s negotiator on Friday told journalists she was tired after sitting at the negotiating table long into the night. 

“We need to find a model where we can meet in the middle and which can ensure that we pull in the income that we are dependent on,” she said. 

Klokset said that there was “a good atmosphere” in the talks, and that the unions were sticking together to represent their members.

“I think we’ve been extremely flexible so far. It’s ‘out of this world’,’ said Henrik Thyregod, with the Danish pilots’ union. 

“This could have been solved back in December if SAS had not made unreasonable demands on the pilots,” Klokset added. 

The strike, which is now in its 12th day, has cost SAS up to 130m kronor a day, with 2,550 flights cancelled by Thursday, affecting 270,000 passengers. 

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ECONOMY

Inflation rate dips in Sweden for first time in seven months

The inflation rate in Sweden fell in July for the first time in seven months, according to official data from Statistics Sweden (SCB), indicating that rate rises may be having an impact on rising prices.

Inflation rate dips in Sweden for first time in seven months

“Lower prices for electricity and fuel contributed to the inflation rate sinking for the first time since January,” said Carl Mårtensson, a price statistician at the agency, in a press release.

The official inflation rate for July this year was 8 percent, down from 8.5 percent in June, and below the consensus estimate of economists at 8.3 percent.

The fall was almost exclusively the result of falling prices for electricity and fuel, with the price of electricity falling by 8.3 percent month on month and the price of petrol and diesel falling 5.6 percent. Excluding energy prices, the inflation rate rose to 6.6 percent from 6.1 percent in June. 

Olle Holmgren, Chief Strategist at Sweden’s SEB Bank said that while inflation pressure remained high, the numbers were cause for hope. 

“Inflation pressures remains high, but the composition of price changes gives some hope that the strong upward trend could be losing some steam,” he wrote in a comment

He noted that the fall in fuel and electricity prices had been offset by an “extremely strong upturn in food prices”, 13.5 percent year on year. 

Alexandra Stråberg, chief economist at the Länsförsäkringar insurance company, however, said that she did not think that the dip in headline inflation meant that the risk of rising prices was over. 

“Unfortunately, it probably hasn’t turned the corner yet,” she told TT. “This is only a short pause.” 

In the chart below from SCB’s press release you can see how four out of the agency’s inflation indexes have dipped in July, after a year of steady rises. 

The index which excludes energy prices, however, has been rising steadily since December. 

Source: Statistics Sweden
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