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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

Everything you need to know about the Tour de France and the release of the inquiry into the 2020 mink scandal are Denmark's headline news this Friday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday
Team Jumbo-Visma's Wout Van Aert near Kalundborg, Denmark on June 30th, 2022. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes

Tour de Denm—uh, France 

It’s an overcast day in Copenhagen for the Grand Départ, the official kickoff of the Tour de France, at 4 p.m. Don’t be fooled when the clouds briefly part midmorning — they’ll be back with a vengeance later this afternoon with the potential to drizzle on late finishers of the time trial (including frontrunner Tadej Podegar, who’s expected to finish about 7:10 p.m.). The Danish Meteorological Institute has put out a warning  for heavy rainfall and thunderstorms for the Copenhagen area from 6-11 p.m. 

A poncho would be in order if you’re planning to watch the riders in person today, and make contingency plans for any outdoor celebrations. 

READ ALSO: Five great spots to see the Tour de France in Denmark 

How to watch the trials 

Danish streaming platform TV2 will host coverage of the Tour, as will Discovery+ in Denmark. 

If you’re watching abroad, the United States offers a selection of streaming services — the USA channel will provide live coverage, through NBC, you’ve got Peacock (their proprietary streaming platform), NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app. 

In the UK, ITV4 and the ITV Hub streaming service are free to watch. 

How to get around in Copenhagen today 

Between street closures, sporadically-open pedestrian crossings, and throngs of fans, trying to get from point A to point B in downtown Copenhagen will be a challenge today. 

The Tour de France team has provided an interactive map (here’s the English version) to help you navigate, including information on those pedestrian crossings of the route, public toilets, and hydration stations (though with the rain, that might be redundant). 

READ ALSO: How will the Tour de France affect traffic and travel in Denmark? 

….and a harsh mink report for Mette Frederiksen 

If all this cycling news leaves you asking, ‘but what about the mink?’, you’ll be thrilled to learn the independent commission tasked with investigating government decisions surrounding the 2020 culling of millions of the weasel-like animals has released its final report. It’s a monster at almost 2,000 pages. 

The commission finds fault with prime minister Mette Frederiksen, who, they say, made “grossly misleading” statements about the legal basis of the mink cull at a November 2020 press conference. 

The report says 10 officials, largely department heads from the Ministry of Justice, Ministry of the Environment and Food, the National Police, and the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, should be held accountable. 

On the hot seat are Barbara Bertelsen, head of the prime minister’s department, and Mogens Jensen, former minister of food, agriculture, and fisheries.

The decision to cull the mink fell under Jensen’s purview and the commission found Jensen was aware the government had no legal authority and lied to parliament about it. Jensen resigned just two weeks after the decision was made. 

READ ALSO: Danish PM ‘grossly misled’ during mink announcement 

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

The potential for a new Danish prime minister, more people on the 'poor payers' list, and the kickoff to Copenhagen Fashion Week are among the top news stories in Denmark this Tuesday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

Frederiksen could call for election as early as next week 

A new opinion poll from Voxmeter by news agency Ritzau gives the Social Democrats, prime minister Mette Frederiksen’s party, their worst showing since 2015. 

Pressure is mounting for the Social Democrats to call for an election as the ‘blue bloc’ — anchored by the Liberal party (Venstre) and the Conservative People’s Party (De Konservative) — command 50 percent of the vote according to the latest poll. Meanwhile, the ‘red bloc’ holds just 47.5 percent. 

The Social Liberals (De Radikale), also of the red bloc, have demanded that Frederiksen hold elections by October at the latest. (Legally, the next general election can take place as late as June 4th, 2023.) 

Analysts say Frederiksen could call for an election as early as next week, when the Social Democrats convene for their summer group meeting. 

READ MORE: A foreigner’s guide to understanding Danish politics in five minutes

‘Hacker attacks’ keep 7-Eleven shuttered (with a few exceptions) 

The vast majority of Denmark’s 176 7-Eleven convenience stores remain hamstrung on Tuesday after what is believed to be a cyber attack on Monday. However, you’ll still be able to pick up GLS packages at ‘closed’ stores, and five capital-area stores can now accept purchases through MobilePay and cash. 

The reopened stores are at Rigshosital, Vesterbrogade, Lyngby Storcenter, and Gammel Kongevej in Copenhagen. Another at the Buddinge Station is Søborg is also back in action. 

READ MORE: Danish convenience stores closed by suspected cyber attack 

More ‘poor payers,’ but less average debt 

Denmark’s largest list of debtors — the RKI, or Riber’s credit information, run by Experian — has increased for the first time since 2014. 

The list is up a very modest 0.5 percent in the last six months, but Experian analysts expect that number to climb before the end of the year. 

“The whole world situation is a bit shaky at the moment,” says Experian director Bo Rasmussen. “War, inflation and rising prices everywhere have an effect on people’s private finances, so you don’t have the same leeway as you did one or two years ago.” 

Just under 172,000 Danes are registered on the RKI after being reported for not paying bills. Appearing on the registry can make it harder to rent an apartment, get a job, or even a mobile phone. 

On the upside, the average person on the RKI owes about 55,000 kroner in unpaid bills, down from about 65,000 kroner last year. 

READ MORE: Boligstøtte: Who can claim Denmark’s national rent subsidy? 

Copenhagen Fashion Week dawns 

Tuesday marks the beginning of Copenhagen Fashion Week, when buyers from all over the world gather to see Danish designers present their newest wares. 

Industry analysts aren’t bullish about the event’s prospects, though, according to broadcaster DR. After a record-breaking 45.1 billion kroner year for Danish fashion companies in 2021, the war in Ukraine and dwindling consumer confidence is likely to mean fewer sales and zero growth. 

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