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2022 SWEDISH ELECTION

Swedish opposition seeks deal on new post-election rule

Sweden's opposition leader has called for an agreement with Sweden's Prime Minister that no government should be allowed to form in future if it does not have support in parliament for its budget.

Swedish opposition seeks deal on new post-election rule
Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson debates with Moderate leader Ulf Kristersson during Prime Minister's Questions in the Swedish parliament. Photo: Henrik Montgomery/TT

Ulf Kristersson, leader of the Moderate Party, said that there should not be a repeat of the situation seen in last two mandate periods, where the Social Democrats have twice had to rule on a budget drawn up by the right-wing opposition. 

“It is not sustainable that a government grips tightly to power when it cannot get its economic policies passed,” he told Magdalena Andersson during Prime Minister’s question time in the Swedish parliament. “Can the two of us agree that no government should take power without having secured support for its economic policies?” 

It was unclear whether this was a serious proposal or a gambit intended to underline the weakness of the government in the run-up to Sweden’s general election in September. 

Securing support for economic policies is arguably more of a challenge for Magdalena Andersson, as two of the parties likely to support her as Prime Minister after the election, the Centre Party and the Left Party, are deeply divided on economic politics, even though they are united on their unwillingness to back a government dependent on the populist Sweden Democrats. 

The Centre Party has supported Andersson as Prime Minister without voting for the Social Democrats’ budget.  

Kristersson’s call comes after the Social Democrats on Wednesday called for its own budget proposition to fall after a compromise on pensions agreed with the Centre Party was blocked by the parliament’s finance committee from being put before parliament. 

“This was a graphic example of the government’s impotence and the decay of government power,” he said.

Sweden’s prime minister, Magdalena Andersson, did not respond to Kristersson’s proposal, but pointed out that after the last election he had failed to establish a government at all. 

“I think that many among the Swedish people wonder what is happening in parliament just now and think that it is chaotic and incomprehensible,” she said. “My ambition is to establish a government that can get through its economic policies.” 

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CITIZENSHIP

Moderate MP calls for moratorium on Swedish citizenship grants

An MP for the right-wing Moderate party has called for a moratorium on Swedish citizenship until new tougher rules planned by the incoming right-wing government are in place.

Moderate MP calls for moratorium on Swedish citizenship grants

Fredrik Kärrholm, a former police officer newly elected as a Moderate MP, floated the idea of the moratorium in a tweet on Thursday. 

“The Christian Democrats, Liberals, Sweden Democrats and Moderates all want to tighten citizenship requirements,” he wrote. 

“Right now 96,411 applications are being processed. While new legislation is being hammered out, a moratorium on new citizenships should be considered.” 

The proposal seems to come from Kärrholm himself, and does not necessarily reflect Moderate Party policy, but it may indicate the thinking of some in the party over tightening citizenship, a subject which is bound to be a significant part of the ongoing discussions on the next government’s programme.  

Kärrholm caused controversy in the election campaign for posing in campaign literature dressed in police uniform, despite having left the police force in 2021. 

Sweden’s national police said at the time that it was inappropriate for former or serving police officers to use police uniform or symbols in political campaigns. 

“This is about preserving the confidence of the public and keeping political roles separate from roles as a public official,” police spokesperson Irene Sokolow told the Aftonbladet newspaper

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