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MOVING TO SPAIN

REVEALED: The cheapest and most expensive areas to buy or rent in Valencia

If you're thinking of a move to Valencia, you should know that the eastern city is renowned for its relatively cheap cost of living compared to other big cities in Spain. So where are the cheapest and most expensive 'barrios' (neighbourhoods) to rent or buy a home?

REVEALED: The cheapest and most expensive areas to buy or rent in Valencia
Valencia is consistently voted as one of the best cities in Europe in terms of cost of living, including when it comes to property prices. Photo: William Carletti/Unsplash

The Mediterranean coast, climate and diet. A city with history, charm, and bustling with life. Valencia has it all, and that is why so many foreigners make it home.

In fact, over 100,000 foreigners have made the eastern Spanish city their home in recent decades, and for good reason.

But what’s the situation when it comes to renting or buying a property?

Before diving into our neighbourhood property guide, let’s have a look at the big picture and see how Valencia stacks up against other Spanish cities. 

Buying a property in Valencia in 2022 costs an average of around €1,839/m2, which means that if you buy a 80/m2 apartment, it would cost you around €147,000.

That’s cheap – in fact, if we compare the average prices in Valencia to Madrid and Barcelona, you’ll realise just how affordable Valencia can be if you know where to look.

Let’s take, for example, Valencia’s most expensive neighbourhood, l’Eixample, in the city centre, which on average costs €3,024/m2 to buy.

That’s quite a bit more than the city-wide average (in barrios further afield the average is around just €1,400/m2), but pales in comparison to the Salamanca district of Madrid (€6,149/m2) and the Sarrià – Sant Gervasi area of Barcelona (€5,228/m2).

Valencia’s affordability is one of the main reasons why so many foreigners have flooded the market in the last two decades.

More than four out of five foreigners in Valencia (82 percent) believe that housing is affordable in the city, compared to 41 percent globally, according to the annual Expat Insider Survey published by InterNations which recently ranked Valencia as the best city in the world for foreign residents.

READ ALSO: Living in Spain: Why Valencia is officially the best city in the world for foreign residents

And renting is cheap too – international cost of living calculator Numbeo found that Valencianos fork out just 27.7 percent of their monthly budget on paying rent.

Before we continue, it’s worth noting that due to rising inflation in Spain and a lack of available properties in Valencia itself, rent and sale prices have increased, keeping in mind that the data in this article is from February 2022, before Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

But we know that by general standards Valencia’s is fairly affordable – but where are the most and least expensive neighbourhoods in the city? 

Cheapest neighbourhoods to buy a property in Valencia

According to Spanish property site Kasaz.com, these are the cheapest Valencian barrios to buy in 2022:

  1. Rascanya is the cheapest place to buy an apartment in Valencia. In the north of Valencia and bordered by better known barrios such as Benimaclet to the east, La Saïdia to the south, and Benicalap to the west, Rascanya is really cheap to buy – on average, buyers pay around €1,133/m2.
  2. L’Olivereta comes in at number 2. Located in the west of the city but just a 15 minute walk from downtown, prices in L’Olivereta average out at around €1,302/m2 but it varies quite a bit within the neighbourhood itself. L’Olivereta is home to five neighbourhoods and prices vary depending on where you are: La Fontsanta €862/m2), Tres Forques (€1,017/m2), Soternes (€1,387/m2), La Llum (€1,415/m2), Nou Moles (€1,456/m2).
  3. Jesús district was a historically industrial neighbourhood, and despite many years of housing shortages, prices have stayed low: buyers there pay on average €1,355/m2. However, having 5 neighbourhoods, prices may vary depending on where you are: Sant Marcellí is the cheapest neighbourhood (€1,214/m2), followed by Camí Reial (€1,238/m2), L’Hort de Senabre (€1,306/m2), La Creu Coberta (€1,353/m2) and La Raiosa (€1,453/m2).

    An official map showing Valencia’s city’s neighbourhoods. Map: Valencia City Hall
  4. Benicalap – the fourth cheapest area in Valencia is one of its oldest. Benicalap dates back to 1238 and it even existed as a separate municipality until it was eventually annexed by the city of Valencia in the late-19th century.

    Located in the northern part of Valencia, Benicalap averages out at about €1,408/m2, but within the district are a few neighbourhoods within which prices vary quite a bit. Ciutat Fallera, for example, is very cheap (€1,006/m2), but Nou Benicalap is much pricier, with averages of €2,148/m2.

  5. Patraix – a family friendly area just 3km from the city centre, prices to buy average €1,437/m2.

    READ ALSO: Moving to Valencia: A guide to the best neighbourhoods to live in

Cheapest neighbourhoods to rent in Valencia

  1. Favara – sandwiched between Patriax and Jesús is the small barrio of Favara in the south of the city, where renters on average pay just €6.03/m2 – the cheapest rate in Valencia.
  2. The Torrefiel neighbourhood of Rascanya comes a close second, costing on average just €6.47/m2 to rent.
  3. San Antoni is Valencia’s third cheapest neighbourhood- up in the north of the city and neighbouring Rascanya – where rents average €6.67/m2.
  4. La Llum – on the western outskirts of Valencia lies La Llum, where renting is also a very affordable €6.86/m2.
  5. San Marcelino – a small neighbourhood belonging to the bigger barrio of Jesús, San Marcelino is an old working class area with cheap rents – €6.95/m2 on average.

Renting or buying in Valencia’s old town Ciutat Vella is logically more expensive. Photo: Al Elmes/Unsplash

Most expensive neighbourhoods to buy in Valencia

If money’s no object to you, here’s a quick breakdown of the most expensive parts to buy in Valencia. See a more detailed sub-neighbourhood by sub-neighbourhood breakdown list over at 7televalencia, which includes both the most expensive and cheapest barrios, but be warned, it’s in Valenciano!

  1. L’Eixample – €2,876/m2 – Upscale L’Eixample is filled with wide, leafy streets lined by department stores and posh brunch spots. Pricey, but trendy.
  2. Ciutat Vella – €2,859/m2 – The old town, or casco antuigo in Spanish, is stuffed to the brim with gothic cathedrals and cobblestone side streets. This is the ‘heart’ of Valencia, and living amongst such hustle, bustle, and history comes at a price.
  3. El Pla del Real – €2,487/m2 – Known by some as Valencia’s nicest district, El Pla del Real is full of green spaces and parks, and is a great place to bring up kids.
  4. Campanar – €2,082/m2 – Campanar’s canal walks and vineyards give it a village like quality right in the middle of the city.
  5. Extramurs – €2,062/m2 – Bordering the old town, Extramurs central location mean it’s pricey and brimming with life – the barrio is home to some of Valencia’s best tapas bars and very popular with students. Top tip: visit the university’s botanic garden for an escape from city life.

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PROPERTY

Ten ways under-35s in Spain can get help to buy a home

Buying a home is particularly difficult for young people in Spain, with low wages, job instability and rising property prices making it a pipe dream for most. But there are several schemes throughout Spain to help make it a reality.

Ten ways under-35s in Spain can get help to buy a home

Many young people in Spain who can afford to move out of their parent’s house cannot yet afford to buy their own home, with down payments and securing a mortgage two of the biggest problems.

According to FotoCasa six in 10 young people in Spain between the ages of 18 and 34 have tried to buy a property, but without success.

The Emancipation Observatory of the Spanish Youth Council (CJE) adds that currently in Spain 59.2 percent of young people rent, while only 17.4 percent own their own property and pay a mortgage. Data shows that most Spaniards aren’t able to buy their own property until they are 41 years old. 

Luckily there are now several government schemes across the country that aim to help young people get on the property ladder. Here are 10 ways that under-35s can get help to buy their first home.

Buying a home in a rural location

The Spanish government introduced a subsidy of €10,800 for those under 35 who wish to purchase a property in towns or villages with less than 10,000 inhabitants, in a bid to help solve the problem of declining rural populations, as well as the issue of young people not being able to afford to buy a home. This is available until December 2022 and can be applied for through the authorities in your region. 

Andalusia

Andalusia announced its ‘First Home Programme’ earlier this year, which is independent but runs parallel to the State Housing Plan. It includes aid of up to €10,800 for the acquisition of habitual residence for young people under 35.

Castilla y León

Those in Castilla y León can apply for aid if they want to live in the province of Soria. Aid is available up to 50 percent, up to a maximum of €5,000 to buy in rural areas within the province. People up to the age of 36 can apply. Find out more on how to apply here

Canary Islands

Young people from the Canary Islands can apply for a housing benefit in 2022 of 20 percent of the cost of the property up to a maximum of €11,000. You are eligible up until the age of 36. Find out more about the aid here

Galicia

Galicia is giving assistance to those wanting to buy in the historic centres of towns and cities. Those aged 35 and under can get up to €12,800 to help them do this, which in turn will help to revive and rejuvenate the oldest parts of the region. You need to apply here before November 15th in order to be in with a chance. 

Madrid

In July 2022, the government of Madrid announced an aid package for young people aged 35 and under. The banks, along with the government of Madrid, will grant mortgage loans for amounts greater than 80 percent and up to 95 percent of the value of the property, provided that the purchase price doesn’t exceed €390,000.

READ ALSO: Why Madrid is now the easiest place in Spain for under-35s to buy their first home

Murcia

The government of Murcia guarantees an aid package of 20 percent, up to €10,850 for those up to the age of 35 who want to buy their own home by getting a mortgage loan. Find out more and apply for the aid here

Valencia region

In Spain’s Valencia region, the Ministry of Housing and Bioclimatic Architecture aims to help make it possible for young people to buy a home who might not otherwise be able to, as well as help towns and villages that are at risk from de-population. The amount each applicant can get will be 20 percent of the value of the price of a house, up to a maximum of €10,800 per person. The cost of the property cannot exceed €120,000 and it must be your main and permanent home. It is available to those up to the age of 35.

READ ALSO: How young people in Spain’s Valencia region can get €10k to buy a home

Aid for large families

Large families or familias numerosas as they are called in Spanish are defined as families who have four or more children. Large families can also benefit from state aid when buying a property, which is €10,800 as long as it does not exceed 20 percent of the property price. When buying a property, these families can also get help by benefiting from a discount on the payment of the Property Transfer Tax (ITP), up to four percent on second-hand purchases. 

Aid for renting

If you can’t yet afford to buy your own property, there are several benefit schemes for young people to be able to move out of their parent’s home and be able to rent instead. The Bono Alquiler Joven allows those between 18 and 35 to get €250 per month to go towards rent and is available across the country. There are various other schemes in different regions too. Find out more and apply here

Be aware, most of these schemes are only available for certain amounts of time and strictly for those who do not already own a property. There may also be prerequisites on the amount of time you have lived in each region. For example, those wanting to benefit from the aid package in Madrid must have lived in the region for the two years leading up to their application.

There are also certain limits as to the amount you can earn in order to be eligible for the benefit. In Valencia, your income must be equal to or less than three times the IPREM (€6984.24 per year for 2022).

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