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Loganair’s Edinburgh and Newcastle flights to Stavanger and Bergen take off

Airline Loganair has resumed flights from Edinburgh to Bergen and Stavanger and launched routes between Newcastle and the two cities on Norway's west coast.

Pictured is Bergen.
Loganair has laucnhed several routes between Newcastle and Edinburgh to Stavanger and Bergen. Photo by Xiaoyang Ou on Unsplash.

For the first time since the pandemic, Loganair’s routes between Edinburgh and Stavanger and Bergen resumed service recently

The airline operates three flights a week to the two destinations on Norway’s west coast. Fights to Stavanger take off every Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. Trips to Bergen depart on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays. 

“Welcoming back more routes between Edinburgh and Norway allows us to enhance connectivity for leisure and business passengers from both countries. For us, it’s about offering passengers choice, and we’re excited to work with Loganair on helping people experience all Bergen and Stavanger have to offer,” Kate Sherry, Aviation Director at Edinburgh Airport, said in a press release

Tickets for the two destinations start from just shy of £100, which includes 15kg of luggage. 

Flights between Aberdeen to Oslo Gardermoen will also commence in September to increase the number of routes available for travellers between Scotland and Norway. 

Last week, the airline began operating direct flights between Newcastle and Bergen. The airline had halted all flights to Norway during the pandemic. The route between Newcastle and Stavanger has also resumed service. 

The recently resumed routes are among a growing number of options for flyers between Scotland and Norway. In April, budget airline Flyr launched a route between Oslo and Edinburgh. 

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SAS

ANALYSIS: Why are SAS pilots on strike?

SAS pilots are causing travel misery for thousands but how do they justify their strike action?

ANALYSIS: Why are SAS pilots on strike?

As many as 900 pilots in Denmark, Norway and Sweden are participating in a strike which SAS has warned will affect 30,000 passengers each day the strike continues

Unions announced that strikes would go ahead after the deadline for the two parties to find an agreement was pushed back several times

When strike action was confirmed, union reps said that the gap between what pilots wanted and what was offered was too far to be bridged with negotiations. 

“We have not succeeded in agreeing with SAS. We have been in long, long negotiations. We have come a long way. We have tried to reach an agreement but experienced that no matter how far we go, it will never be enough,” Martin Lindgren from the Swedish Pilot Association and leader of the SAS Pilot Group told business and financial site E24

The gap between the parties stems from two issues. Firstly, pilots are unhappy with the wages and working conditions offered by SAS. Unions have said that pilots were willing to take a five percent pay cut and work longer hours to strike a deal. 

READ ALSO: How long could the SAS pilot strike last?

However, the bigger issue for SAS pilots is that instead of re-employing those SAS pilots who were laid off during cutbacks caused by the pandemic, priority is instead being given to hiring new pilots on cheaper deals in two subsidiaries, SAS Link and SAS Connect.

The creation of the two subsidiaries came at a similar time as when 560 pilots lost their jobs due to the airline slashing costs across the board. 

Meanwhile, the airline has argued that hiring new pilots to the subsidiaries is an essential part of cost-cutting practices to ensure the airline’s survival. The airline has said that the subsidiaries are a vital step in attempting to cut costs by 7.5 billion kroner annually as part of the firm’s SAS Forward plan. 

In contrast, pilots’ representatives argue that using subsidiaries was a form of union-busting and goes against the Scandinavian working model. 

Last week, Roger Klokset, head of the Norwegian SAS pilots’ association, told newspaper VG said they were willing to see the company go under if needs be. 

“Yes. Undoubtedly if the company fails to relate to the Scandinavian model, we believe that is an actor that doesn’t have the right to life,” Klokset told VG. 

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