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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

A new military hub for Nato on Danish shores, a filmmaker representing Denmark at Cannes, and a slightly cooler weekend are among the top news stories in Denmark this Friday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday
Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen and Nato Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg inspect troops in Copenhagen on May 19, 2022. Photo: Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix 2022

‘Military hub’ for US, Nato forces coming to Denmark 

The port city of Esbjerg, which also played host to this week’s green energy meetings, has been flagged as the site of a new mustering point for Nato and especially United States military forces, according to a press release from the Danish Ministry of Defense. 

The United States expressed interest in Esbjerg, on Jutland’s west coast, in particular as a jumping-off point to transport troops and technology to the Baltic Sea area. 

“The Port of Esbjerg has a good location and size, proximity to the airport, good connections to the railway and motorway network and is close to several large barracks,” the press release said. 

The Danish government plans to make a number of costly improvements to the port to better support the new military hub. Those are expected to be completed by the end of 2023, the release said. 

READ ALSO: Denmark prepared to send 800 troops to Baltic states

Iranian living in Copenhagen shines at Cannes Film Festival

Danish-Iranian Ali Abassi, 40, is making waves at the Cannes Film Festival with his new film “Holy Spider,” the “gritty story of a serial killer ‘cleansing’ the Iranian holy city of Mashhad,” newswire Agence France-Presse reports. 

Abassi grew up in Iran and immigrated to Scandinavia to study architecture in Stockholm at the age of 21, ultimately settling in Copenhagen after attending the National Film School of Denmark. 

In 2018, Abassi brought home the trophy for Cannes’ Un Certain Regard section with “Border,” which AFP describes as an “eccentric troll-fantasy film about a border guard.” 

Cooler weather ahead 

After two balmy days, Denmark can expect a cooler and cloudier weekend, according to the Danish Meteorological Institute. 

“The beautiful weather has almost disappeared like dew to the sun,” meteorologist Klaus Larsen told newswire Ritzau with a little poetic flair. 

We can look forward (or not) to a Saturday with minimal sunshine, “fresh” winds, occasional showers, and temperatures between 14-18 degrees. 

Sunday is your best chance for outdoor fun, Larsen says. “It will stay mostly dry with little or no sun and winds that will decrease and become light to steady during the day.” 

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

A plan to shut down job centers, new resources for young people with eating disorders, and Tivoli's bottom line are among the top news stories in Denmark on Tuesday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

Liberal party presents plan to shut down job centers 

The current employment system is unsalvageable and will need to be rebuilt from the ground up, according to a new plan presented by the Liberal party. 

Their vision focuses on reducing bureaucracy and spending on the job centers themselves — of the 12 billion kroner spent on employment in Denmark annually, five billion kroner goes to the running of job centers, newswire Ritzau reports. The Liberals are also eyeing cuts to benefit rates in the first three months of unemployment, as well as re-introducing a cash assistance ceiling. 

READ MORE: A-kasse: Everything foreigners in Denmark need to know about unemployment insurance 

New resource for young people with eating disorders, self-harming behaviors 

There’s a new way for children and youth to reach out for help with eating disorders and self-harm online. 

The Association for Eating Disorders and Self-Injury has opened up a messaging platform on spiseforstyrrelse.dk to connect struggling young people with volunteers trained to help counsel them on their options. 

The Association currently receives about 4,000 inquiries annually by phone or email, and it’s hoped the new service could reach an additional 500 young people in need of help. 

“Many find it difficult to seek help and to find the courage to call us,” association director Laila Walther tells Ritzau. “We want to make it easier.” 

Tivoli edges closer to pre-pandemic profits 

Copenhagen amusement park Tivoli has seen booming business this summer, according to their profit statements for the first half of the year. Several red-letter days, including the presentation of the Tour de France cycling teams which drew a stunning 15,000 people, have contributed to “visitor numbers that exceed expectations,” their midyear report said. 

While attendance levels haven’t quite reached pre-pandemic levels, more international tourists are lining up for the Tivoli experience, director Susanne Mørch Koch said. 

READ MORE: Tour de France gets rapturous reception in Copenhagen 

Regular Covid testing returns for nursing home employees 

With autumn on the horizon, staff at nursing homes and home health care workers will receive PCR tests every 14 days, according to a new directive from the State’s Serum Institute, Denmark’s infectious disease agency. 

Visitors of nursing home residents over the age of 85 are also encouraged to test before arriving, though it’s not required. 

Henrik Ullum from the SSI says this doesn’t foreshadow a return to widespread testing for the greater population. “The most important thing is first of all not to go to work” if you’re experiencing symptoms of a Covid-like illness, he explains. 

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