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Revealed: The most expensive places in Italy to buy a house in 2022

Many factors are at play when deciding where to purchase a home in Italy. To help you decide, here are the most expensive and sought-after locations in Italy, according to the latest data.

Revealed: The most expensive places in Italy to buy a house in 2022
Where are the most expensive places to buy and where's the most popular? Photo by Caleb Miller on Unsplash

Searching for the right property in Italy involves a balancing act of location, price, convenience and how much, if any, restoration work needs to be done.

Budget usually tops the list for house-hunters, narrowing down the number of potentials for making your move to or within Italy.

If the entire country is your blank slate, here are the areas in Italy that rank as the most expensive – and desired – according to data from property portal Idealista for the first quarter of 2022.

The report ranks the top 100 municipalities according to popularity, based on those listings generating the most leads (email contacts and shares) and those where the average final sale price is highest.

READ ALSO: How bargain homes made one Italian town €100 million in two years

Taking the top spot for the most expensive place to buy in Italy is Pietrasanta in Versilia, in the province of Lucca, which the researchers also state holds first place in the top 100 most expensive places to rent a house too.

This area includes the playground of the rich, Forte dei Marmi, where the average selling price of a house is over half a million euros (€541,351).

The table below shows the full ranking.

In second place is Alassio, in the province of Savona, where homebuyers will on average shell out €467,019 for a residential property (again, valid for the first quarter of 2022).

Venice comes in at third place, where the average asking price is €433,640.

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: The hidden costs of buying a home in Italy

In the top 10 spots, the report noted that the most expensive properties are in tourist resorts, possibly driven by those wanting second homes in popular locations.

Such locations include Lerici, Riccione, Desenzano del Garda, Camaiore and Cervia, while the cities of Florence and Milan, where average sale prices exceed €350,000, have also made the top 10.

The study revealed that the final average price of a house for sale in Rome is €273,341.

Researchers also looked at popularity of locations, based on pressure of demand on supply across Italy.

Bologna topped the charts, making it the city with the highest number of contacts per advert (4.7) of houses for sale published on idealista. Cagliari followed in second with 3.8 contacts per advert and Milan (3.4 contacts per advert). Trieste, Naples, Rome, Salerno, Brescia, Verona and Lecce also made the top 10.

READ ALSO: 15 insider tips to make living in Bologna even better

Here’s a selection of the most popular places to buy in Italy based on the report data, narrowed down to the top 20.

See more in The Local’s Italian property section.

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COST OF LIVING

What is Italy doing to fight rising cost of everyday goods?

The level of inflation in Italy reached 8 percent in June so what products are getting more expensive in the country and what measures are being taken by the Italian government to keep prices down?

What is Italy doing to fight rising cost of everyday goods?

Italy’s national statistics institute Istat has estimated inflation for June 2022 will hit 8 percent, up from the 6.8 percent in May, a record in the country that hasn’t seen such a spike in prices since January 1986.

“All of us in the government have the task of killing the inflation monster”, Minister for Public Administration Renato Brunetta said in an interview with the Quotidiano Nazionale on Sunday.

The minister said that the government is pushing for a price cap on gas and oil prices and calls for a “European agreement now” to regulate limits.

Any measures to create a ceiling for prices would need to follow European regulations, and EU countries must agree on them before members implement limits on fuel prices.

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: What is Italy’s new digital invoicing rule for freelancers?

A major issue with rising prices is that wages lose their value, Brunetta explained. As a result, Italians can now buy fewer things with the same salary as one year ago.

Worker’s unions are looking to adjust collective agreements for wage readjustments, while companies fear that simply increasing salaries could prolong the crisis, Brunetta said.

What is the government doing to combat inflation?

The minister said then that the government is proposing a reduction in taxes incurred in workers’ wages to increase purchasing power without overburdening the employers.

He added authorities are also looking into “targeted and selective interventions”, including extending social benefits to low-income people.

Among the measures and proposals, he mentioned the targeted €200 bonus for Italian households to help with utility bills.

READ ALSO: Who can claim Italy’s €200 cost of living bonus?

The payments were announced in May alongside other government measures to offset the soaring cost of living, such as extending energy bill discounts and rolling on the deadline to claim Italy’s popular ‘super bonus 110’.

Pension amounts will also be reevaluated and adjusted for inflation more often and at higher rates, the minister said – the same with severance payments. He didn’t give further details, though.

Where can the increases be seen more dramatically?

Italy’s statistics institute says that “several types of products” have had price increases in the country, according to a press release. The main increase (48.7 percent year on year) can be seen in “energy goods”, such as fuel and gas.

READ ALSO: Italian property prices continue to rise in 2022

Food in Italy is also more expensive, both unprocessed food (9.6 percent increase) such as fruits and vegetables, and processed food (up by 8.2 percent). Recreational, cultural, and personal care services are also more expensive, up 5 percent compared to June 2021.

The institute says that the highest increases can be seen in housing, water, electricity and fuel supply. Or essential goods and living conditions for Italian households.

As fuel prices soar worldwide, Italians also see an increase in transport costs. The third sector with the most dramatic increases is food and beverage products, according to the institute report.

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