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UKRAINE

How you can help Ukrainian media 

Ukrainian media outlets are working tirelessly under extreme pressure to get the news out and keep Ukrainians informed about all aspects of the Russian invasion. Here’s how you can help. 

A woman signs a Ukranian flag at the Ukraine Pavillion Expo 2020 in Dubai.
A woman signs a Ukranian flag at the Ukraine Pavillion Expo 2020 in Dubai, on February 27, 2022. Photo: Giuseppe Cacace/AFP

In the wake of Russia’s invasion, accurate information is more important than ever. But journalists working in the country are facing unprecedented challenges. 

As a result, media partners across Europe are joining forces to give Ukrainian outlets all the financial, operational and technical support they need at a very difficult time. 

And as the robust response to Vladimir Putin’s aggression from the EU and elsewhere has shown, coordinated challenges to Russia’s unjustifiable attack are entirely necessary to ensure that Ukraine can continue to operate as a modern, functioning democracy. 

The Local is convinced that this solidarity with Ukraine is not just right but crucial, and thanks to the support of our members we are happy to be able to make a €20,000 donation to the fundraiser.

If you would also like to donate you can find all the information you need at the link below. 

More from the campaign page: 

Ukraine is facing an unprecedented, full-scale war. Media across the country continue to operate under the most challenging circumstances.

They have shown extraordinary courage, but the reality on the ground is that most operations cannot continue from Ukraine alone. This fundraiser is aimed at helping media relocate, set-up back offices and continue their operations from neighboring countries.

Ways to support media activities in Ukraine (e.g., purchases of security equipment, paying drivers, medical care) are outlined below.

This campaign is run by a consortium of The Fix , Are We Europe , Jnomics and Media Development Foundation , as well as multiple media partners from across Europe.

We are working with a growing list of Ukrainian media, including Ukrainska Pravda, Zaborona, Detector Media and others. Support is allocated based on urgency of needs in the first place, then distributed proportionally.

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ENERGY

Russia suspends gas to Italy after ‘problem’ in Austria

Russia's Gazprom has suspended gas deliveries to Italy's Eni, blaming a transport problem in Austria, the Italian energy giant said on Saturday.

Russia suspends gas to Italy after 'problem' in Austria

“Gazprom told us that it was not able to confirm the delivery of the volumes demanded for today, citing the impossibility of gas transport through Austria,” Eni said in a statement.

As a result, “Russian gas flows to Eni via the Tarvisio entry point will be naught”, it said.

In a statement published on Telegram, Gazprom said the problem was due to regulatory changes in Austria that took place at the end of September and that it was working with Italian customers to resolve the issue.

According to Gazprom, the Austrian gas grid operator had refused to confirm the transport nominations.

In Austria, regulatory authority E-Control said the new rules, which entered into force on Saturday, had been “known to all market actors for months”.

It said it expected “all to conform and take the necessary measures to fulfil their obligations”.

The problems were related to “contractual details” linked to the transit of gas towards Italy, it said on Twitter, adding in response to a tweeted question that this currently had “no effect” on users in Austria.

Most of Russian gas delivered to Italy passes via Ukraine through the Trans Austria Gas Pipeline (TAG), to Tarvisio in northern Italy on the border with Austria.

Before the war in Ukraine, Italy imported 95 percent of the gas it consumes — about 45 percent of which came from Russia.

Outgoing Prime Minister Mario Draghi has signed new deals with other gas producers to reduce Italy’s reliance on Russia, lowered to 25 percent as of June, while accelerating a shift towards renewable energies.

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