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The most in-demand jobs in Spain in 2022

If you’re thinking of relocating to Spain but want to make sure you land a job, here are the 20 most in-demand jobs in the country in 2022 according to LinkedIn. 

barcelona skyline night
Dreaming of a move to Barcelona? The most in-demand jobs in Spain currently are mainly in tech, but not all. Photo: Wyron A/Unsplash

One of the biggest challenges for people who want to move to Spain is finding the right job which will help them further their careers.

It’s easier for EU nationals as they enjoy the freedom of movement to easily live and work in Spain, whereas for third-country nationals getting a job here depends in many cases on the prospective employer not finding a suitable EU candidate for the position (although Spain has just made it easier for Spanish companies to hire workers from outside of the EU).

READ ALSO: The visas Americans need to live and work in Spain

But who are the job candidates that are most sought-after in Spain and the skills that could ensure that you get the job as a foreigner, even if your Spanish isn’t up to scratch yet or even if you need a work visa for Spain?

International job search engine LinkedIn has published a list of the 20 jobs that according to their data are most in demand in Spain in 2022, with bigger growth over the past five years than any other positions advertised. 

It’s a list that’s dominated by tech-related positions, which reflects how the work market is changing (this is our last list of non-tech related jobs that are in demand in Spain). 

Here is the top 20 list, including the core skills required for each position, the cities in Spain where most of these jobs are and the desired experience for candidates.

Site Reliability Engineer (Ingeniero/a de fiabilidad del sitio)

Required skills: Ansible, Docker, Amazon Web Services (AWS) 

Cities with the most contracts : Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Palma de Mallorca

Average years of prior experience: 9.6

Business development representative (Responsable de desarrollo de negocio)

Required skills: Salesforce, Business Development, Lead Generation

Cities with the most contracts : Barcelona, ​​Madrid, Valencia

Average years of prior experience: 5.6

Cloud Architect (Arquitecto/a de sistemas en la nube)

Most common skills: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, Cloud Computing

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Alicante

Average years of prior experience: 13 

Machine Learning Engineer (ingeniero de aprendizaje automático)

Required skills: Machine Learning, Computer Vision, Data Science 

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Valencia

Average years of experience: 5.2 years

Cybersecurity Specialist (experto/a en ciberseguridad)

Required Skills: Cybersecurity, Ethical Hacking, Information Security

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Seville

Average years of experience: 8.3 years 

Software Application Engineer (Ingeniero/a de aplicaciones)

Core Skills: Java, Eclipse, SQL 

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Zaragoza, Alicante 

Average years of experience: 5.5 years

Clinical Trial Manager (Responsable de ensayos clínicos)

Required Skills: Good Clinical Practice, Clinical Trial Management System, Oncology

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Valencia

Average years of experience: 9.6 years

Infrastructure Engineer (Ingeniero/a de infraestructura)

Required skills: Amazon Web Services, Ansible, Infrastructure

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Valencia 

Average years of experience: 9.4 years

Supply Chain Planning Manager (Responsable de cadena de suministro)

Required skills: Supply Chain Management, SAP Products, Production Planning

Cities with the most contracts: Barcelona, ​​Madrid, Toledo 

Average years of experience: 5.8 years

Clinical site specialist 

Required skills: good clinical practice, clinical research, oncology

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​surroundings of Madrid 

Average years of experience: 9.7 years

Mortgage Loan Officer (Agente hipotecario)

Required skills: Home Loans, Residential Mortgages, Refinancing

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Alicante 

Average years of experience: 7.4 years

User Experience Researcher

Required skills: Usability, User Centered Design, Wireframing

Cities with the most contracts: Barcelona, ​​Madrid, La Coruña

Average years of experience: 9.3 years

Back-end Developer (Desarrollador/a back-end)

Required skills: Git, Docker, MongoDB 

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Valencia

Average years of experience: 7 years

Sustainability manager (Responsable de sostenibilidad)

Required skills: Sustainable Development, Sustainability Reporting, Consulting

Cities with the most hires: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Seville

Average years of experience: 6.5 years

Data Engineer (Ingeniero/a de datos)

Required skills: Apache Spark, Scala, Hadoop

Cities with the most hires: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Seville

Average years of experience: 7.2 years

Strategic Planning Manager (Responsable de planificación estratégica)

Required skills: Business Strategy, Digital Transformation, Management Consulting

Cities with the most hires: Madrid, Barcelona

Average years of experience: 7.8 years

Customer Relationship Management Analyst

Required skills: Salesforce, Microsoft Dynamics CRM, SQL 

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Malaga

Average years of experience: 6 years

Talent Acquisition Specialist (Técnico/a de selección de personal or reculatador)

Required skills: Recruiting, Talent Management, LinkedIn Recruiter

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona, ​​Valencia 

Average years of experience: 5.1 years

Software Account Executive (Ejecutivo/a de cuentas de software)

Required skills : Solution Selling, SaaS, Enterprise Software

Cities with the most contracts: Madrid, Barcelona

Average years of experience : 12.7 years

Mechanical Supervisor (Supervisor/a mecánico/a)

Required skills: Project Engineering, Inspection, AutoCAD

Cities with the most contracts: Huelva, Cáceres, Seville 

Average years of experience: 11.7 years

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WOMEN'S RIGHTS

Spanish government divided over proposed menstruation leave bill

Talk of abortion policy reform and proposed menstrual leave has dominated Spanish discourse this week, but it’s also dividing Spain’s coalition government.

Spanish government divided over proposed menstruation leave bill

Spain’s PSOE-fronted coalition government recently outlined proposals that have dominated public discourse in the country.

But the legislation, which would allow women over the age of 16 to get abortions without the permission of their parents and introduce ‘menstruation leave’ for those suffering serious period pains, has not only divided Spanish society but the government itself.

The proposals would make Spain a leader in the Western world, and the first European Union member state to introduce menstrual leave, and changes to abortion law would overturn a 2015 law passed by the conservative People’s Party that forced women aged 16 and 17 to obtain parental consent.

The wide-ranging bill would also end VAT on menstrual products, increase the free distribution of them in schools, and allow between three and five days of leave each month for women who experience particularly painful periods.

READ MORE: What are Spain’s abortion laws for foreign residents and visitors?

Menstrual leave

Ángela Rodríguez, the Secretary of State for Equality, told Spanish newspaper El Periódico in March that “it’s important to be clear about what a painful period is – we’re not talking about slight discomfort, but about serious symptoms such as diarrhoea, fever and bad headaches.”

“When there’s a problem that can’t be solved medically, we think it’s very sensible to have temporary sick leave,” she added.

Cabinet politics

The proposals are slated for approval in cabinet next week, and judging by reports in the Spanish media this week, it is far from reaching a consensus. It is believed the intra-cabinet tensions stem not from the changes to abortion and contraception accessibility, but rather the proposed menstrual leave.

The junior coalition partner in government, Podemos, largely supports the bill, but it is believed some in the PSOE ranks are more sceptical about the symbolism and employment effects of the proposed period pain policy.

Vice President and Minister of Economic Affairs, Nadia Calviño, said this week: “Let me repeat it very clearly: this government believes and is absolutely committed to gender equality and we will never adopt measures that may result in a stigmatisation of women.”

Yet Second Vice President and Minister of Labour, Yolanda Díaz, who is viewed as further to the left than President Pedro Sánchez and other PSOE cabinet ministers, is reportedly “absolutely in favour” of the measure to reform Spain’s “deeply masculinised” labour market.

Sources in the Spanish media have this week also reported that some PSOE cabinet ministers feel the proposed paid leave not only plays up to stereotypes of women, or stigmatises them, like Calviño says, but also places them at a disadvantage in the world of work.

Minister of Inclusion, Social Security and Migration, José Luis Escrivá, stated that while the government should seek to improve women’s employment protections, it should also seek to boost their participation in the labour market under “better conditions.”

In that vein, some feel menstrual leave could be used a form of of employment discrimination similarly to how pregnancy has been historically, and the policy would, in that sense, actually be more regressive than progressive in enshrining women’s workplace rights. 

READ MORE: Spain eyes free contraception for under-25’s

Trade unions

Trade unions are also sceptical of the menstrual leave legislation. Cristina Antoñanzas, deputy secretary of UGT, one of Spain’s largest trade unions, has echoed those in the cabinet who feel the proposals could “stigmatise women.” She added that “it does women a disservice.”

Public opinion

A survey run by INTIMINA found that 67 percent of Spanish women are in favour of regulating menstrual leave, but also that 75 percent fear it is “a double-edged sword” that could generate labor discrimination.

The survey also found that 88 percent of women who suffer from disabling and frequent period pain have gone to work despite it. Seventy-one percent admitted that they have normalised working with pain.

Cabinet showdown

The proposed menstrual leave policy will be debated in cabinet next week when the Council of Ministers debates and approves the broader abortion and contraception reforms. According to sources in the Spanish media, and many cabinet ministers themselves, it seems a consensus on menstruation leave is a long way off.




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