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FISHING

French fishermen block ports and Channel Tunnel lorries in Brexit protest

French fishermen on Friday staged blockades at three ferry ports and the freight entrance for the Channel Tunnel in a day of action to protest at the post-Brexit fishing rights granted by Britain.

French fishermen block ports and Channel Tunnel lorries in Brexit protest
Fresh fishing vessels block the entrance to the Calais port. Photo: Bernard Barron/AFP

The fishermen used cars and vans to stage a two-hour blockade on the A16 motorway, blocking freight traffic heading towards England via the Channel Tunnel, while others used their boats to blockade the ferry ports at Saint-Malo, Calais and Ouistreham. 

The protests were over the ongoing dispute over post-Brexit fishing licences.

Boats blocked the Saint-Malo port in the morning – although did not cause disruptions as all ferried had earlier been cancelled due to bead weather – before moving to Calais and then Ouistreham.

Vehicles moved into position on the A16 at around 2pm before the blockade was lifted at 4pm – traffic did not come to a complete standstill in the affected areas.

The regional chief of the CNPMEM fishing union, Olivier Lepretre, said the action was intended to “put pressure on the British government”, and threatened other actions including on products imported from the UK.

“The fishermen are demanding an immediate resolution to the dispute with the UK over the interpretation of the Brexit agreement,” Gérard Romiti, the president of the national fisheries committee, told Le Figaro newspaper on Thursday.

“Our patience has its limits, it has been only too well tested.”

The granting of post-Brexit fishing licences to around 150 French fishermen to fish around the Channel Islands and in the inner waters off the British coastline has become a fraught political issue involving the British, French and Jersey governments, as well as the EU.

The European Commission has asked London to settle the issue by December 10th.

READ ALSO ANALYSIS: Macron’s dilemma over Franco-British fishing spat

“We don’t want handouts, we just want our licenses back. The UK must abide by the post-Brexit deal. Too many fishermen are still in the dark,” said Romiti.

“We have been waiting with bated breath for 11 months. The patience of professionals has limits. We hope this warning shot will be heard,” he said, refusing to rule out further actions in the future.

France had threatened to ban British boats from unloading their catches at French ports and to subject all British imports to inspections.

President Emmanuel Macron then said France would hold off imposing the measures to give dialogue a chance, but French officials have insisted that all options remain on the table.

Talks between France’s Europe Minister Clément Beaune and Britain’s Brexit minister David Frost have yet to yield a breakthrough.

Under a deal agreed by Britain and the EU late last year, European fishing vessels can continue to ply UK waters if they operated there in the past.

But Paris says dozens of French boats have had their applications to fish the UK’s rich waters rejected, an assessment strongly contested by London.

The total volumes affected are tiny in terms of overall France-UK bilateral trade.

But the issue has contributed to growing post-Brexit strains between London and Paris, whose relationship will now also be tested by their response to Wednesday’s disaster in the Channel that cost 27 lives.

Member comments

  1. Could be counter-productive . My understanding is that any boat pictured damaging UK trade will have any current licence cancelled and be barred from any future licence.

    1. Good. I think a good line in the sand would be revoking all licences in the event of continuing illegal blockades.

      1. and the French then stop all fish from being unloaded in France where 80% of its catch goes and ban all UK boats from entering French waters. It’s playground politics played by playground politicians. Seen so many interviews with fishermen Brit and French getting totally pissed off with these political games . They are all on the same side.

        1. And UK provides the principal market for French wine . By your reckoning that shouldn’t be allowed to continue either.

          1. The principal market for French wine is France. The wines exported to the UK are mainly champagne and expensive bordeaux and burgundies. I spent the first 57 years of my life in the UK and knew very few people who drank wine. It is a luxury for the ‘better off’ Most people’s staple is beer. Now, do you think the UK’s elite would welcome a ban on the top end wines?

      2. What utter balderdash. After owning trawlers, through a family company, on both sides of le manche. All these people want to do is fish in the area they have for generations. There has always been a friendly rivalry, but now it’s being fueled by politicians and the British guttersnipe press into something it never has been. These fishermen are fighting to put food on their tables. Wouldn’t you do the same?

        1. You need to catch up Boggy. UK is no longer part of the Common Fisheries Policy. The criteria for getting a licence is set out in the annexes to the Trade and Co-operation Agreement and according to Jersey there’s about 100 French fishermen just trying it on. In any event, come 2026, there will be no licenses issued and between now and then a 25% cut in EU catch quotas. It’s the new reality. The UK fishing industry paid the price for joining the EU and the French fishing industry will pay the price for the UK leaving. C’est la vie.

  2. If there is a legal basis for such an action, the UK can do this. But without an existing legal arrangement you can’t just invent sanctions and punishments on the go. Rule of law, and such, you know.

    1. Protest and demonstration is fine. Interruption of trade and obstruction is criminal and has to be punished. If the French State co-operates with the fishermen then they will be in breach of the UK’s T&C Agreement with the EU and the UK can claim damages.

  3. So, it seems that it’s ok for Brit(english) fishermen to fish in French waters but not for French fishermen to fish in English waters. Surprised or not !I’m hoping to spend Christmas with my daughter and grandchildren in England but if the English continue with their stance although I and my wife will be very sad, I will still back the French fishermen. Brit in France.

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MOVING TO FRANCE

The post-Brexit guide for Brits who want to move to France (and stay here)

Is it harder since Brexit? Yes. Is it impossible? Certainly not. Here's everything you need to know about navigating the French immigration system and moving to France as a UK national.

The post-Brexit guide for Brits who want to move to France (and stay here)

Moving to France as the citizen of an EU country is a considerably more straightforward experience – and that’s still the case for those Brits lucky enough to have dual nationality with an EU country such as Ireland.

For the rest, since Brexit they enter an unfamiliar world of immigration offices, visas and cartes de séjour – but this is only the same system that non-EU nationals like Americans, Canadians and Australians have always faced and plenty of them manage to move to France each year.

It’s just a question of knowing how to navigate the system:

NB – this article is for people making the move permanently to France from 2021 onwards, for second-home owners who want to spend time in France but keep their main residence in the UK – click HERE

Visas 

Brits are covered by the 90-day rule so if you want to make short visits to France you can do so without any extra paperwork (until 2023, that is), but if you want to come here to live, you will need a visa.

The only groups exempt from visa requirements are people who have dual nationality with an EU country (eg Ireland) or people who are coming as a spouse or family member of a UK national who is already living here and is covered by the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement – click here for full details.

It’s important to note that your visa has to be sorted before you leave the UK, so there’s no point coming over here as a tourist and then hoping to figure it out from France.

Almost all visas charge processing fees and you need to be prepared to create a big bundle of supporting documents, but the first thing to do is work out the type of visa that you need.

Here’s an overview of the most common types:

Spouse Visa

Contrary to popular belief, being married to a French person doesn’t exempt you from the visa process, but does make things a little easier if you decide to go for a spouse visa – you’ll be able to get a 12-month visa and you’ll have to register at the Immigration Office (OFFI) within three months of arrival. This will count as your residence card (more info on how to get residency later).

The good news is that the application is free but you’ll need a heap of documents including application forms, proof of marriage, proof of your spouse’s nationality, and a residence form. More info here.

Work Visa

If you intend to work in France then you have two options; get a work visa as a salaried employee or get an entrepreneur visa if you intend to set up your own business or work self-employed as a freelancer or contractor.

Employee visa – The toughest part of the employee visa is that you need to find a job first, rather than coming to France and then job-hunting. 

Once you find a job, you then need to have your work contract approved by the authorities at the French Labour Ministry (then again at the OFFI offices) and depending on the sector you work in your employer may have to apply for a work permit and justify why they’re hiring you and not a European.

If you’re bringing family on this visa, get the employer to start a file for them at the same time. You’ll need to fill in application forms, residence forms, and you’ll need to pay a processing fee.  

Entrepreneur – this applies for people who want to set up their own business (eg run a gîte or B&B) or work in an self-employed capacity including as a freelancer or contractor. 

The entrepreneur visa has different requirements, including a detailed business plan and proof of financial means – essentially you need to be able to demonstrate that you can support yourself even if your business idea or freelance career never takes off.

Here 2021 arrival Joseph Keen takes us through the entrepreneur visa: ‘Not too complicated but quite expensive’ – what it’s like getting a French work visa

Visitor Visa

This is for those who want to live in France but don’t have a job, a French spouse, or plans to study – it’s most commonly used by retired people and it brings with it the requirement to have a certain level of assets.

READ ALSO How much money do I need to get a French visa?

You’ll need: filled-in questionnaires and application forms, an undertaking not to work in France (not even working remotely for an employer back in the UK or setting up a gîte or B&B business in France), proof that you can support yourself in France, proof of financial means, proof of medical insurance, proof of accommodation in France, among other things. More info here

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Student visa

The good news is that the fee is around half that of the other long stay visas, at €50, and is usually shorter to process, but the bad news is that it’s no walk in the park.

You’ll need a series of documents from Campus France, financial guarantees and proof of enrolment at a French establishment of higher education. More info here

Au Pair visa

If you’re between the ages of 17 and 30, don’t mind a few household chores and quite like children, then this year-long visa could be right up your alley.

You’ll need all the usual forms, but also an “au pair contract” approved by the French ministry of labour, an invitation from your host family, and you’ll have to sign up to language courses for while you’re here. Read more about becoming an au pair here, and find out more on the visa info here

Talent Passport

If you qualify for it, there’s also the ‘talent passport’ which is really the best type of visa because it lasts for four years before you need to renew and you can bring family members on it. 

It offers a four-year work visa to people who can demonstrate certain business, creative or academic skills, or who have a provable reputation in their field – for example, scientific, literary, artistic, intellectual, educational, or sporting. The categories were recently expanded and cover quite a wide variety of fields. More info here.

Besides these options, there is always a scientist visa, an internship visa, and a diplomatic visa.

Next steps

Once you have decided which visa you need, you apply online, submitting all the required documents and a fee (usually around €80-€100). You will then need to make an in-person visit to the French consulate in London.

EXPLAINED: How to get a French visa 

Processing times for visas vary, but you should allow at least six weeks.

What else?

Once you have secured your visa you’re more or less ready to travel, but there are some other things to check.

Health insurance – some visa types, especially those for people who will not be working, require proof of health insurance and depending on the type of visa the GHIC or EHIC card is not always accepted.

If this is the case you will need to buy a private health insurance (not travel insurance) policy that covers the entire duration of your visa. Depending on your age and state of health these policies can be expensive, so you should factor this in to your financial calculations.

If you are a UK pensioner or student you might be entitled to an S1 form from the NHS – S1 is accepted as proof of health insurance for visa purposes.

Once you have been living in France for three months, you’re entitled to register in the public health system and get a carte vitale, but the process of getting the card can be quite lengthy, so it’s a good idea to have health cover for these early months even if it’s not a requirement of your visa.

Bear in mind the GHIC/EHIC doesn’t cover all types of medical expenses.

Driving licence – if you intend to drive in France then you can use your UK/NI licence with no requirement for an international driver’s permit.

The good news here is that the post-Brexit deal on driving licences also covers new arrivals, and means that after a certain period you can swap your UK licence for a French one without having to take the French driving test – full details here.

If you are bringing your UK-registered car with you, you will have to change its registration to French – here’s how.

Bank account – for everyday life in France you will likely need a French bank account, but many French banks require proof of an address, while landlords often won’t rent to you without a French bank account, creating something of a Catch 22. 

READ ALSO Everything you need to know about opening a French bank account

If you still have financial activity in the UK such as a rental property or a UK pension you will likely need a UK bank account too, but keeping UK accounts while resident in France is becoming more difficult. We spoke to a financial expert to get some tips

Taxes – this hasn’t changed since Brexit, but it’s something that often catches people out – if you live in France you need to file an annual tax declaration, even if you have no income in France (eg you are living on a pension from the UK). More details here.

If you still have financial activity in the UK – such as a property rental – you will usually also need to file a tax return in the UK, but while you have all the fun of doing two tax declarations every year, a dual-taxation agreement between France and the UK means you won’t have to pay tax twice on the same income. 

And how to stay in France

But once you’re in France, you might want to stay here. Think that getting your visa represents the end of your French paperwork? Dream on!

Depending on the type of visa you have you may be required to visit OFII (Office Français de l’Immigration et Intégration) on arrival to register and you may be required to undergo a medical examination or to take French classes if your language skills are a little basic.

Other types of visa require you to validate them at your local préfecture within a certain time period.

These ‘in country’ steps are important, so in between popping Champagne when your visa arrives, take the time to read carefully the accompanying documents and note down when you need to take the next steps.

Your visa will also need renewing, most initial visas last for one year, but there are exceptions.

The exact steps vary depending on your visa type, but the most common route is to apply for a residency permit (carte de séjour) so that you can stay longer than just 12 months – you usually apply for this two months before your visa runs out.

We look in more detail at the next steps HERE.

French administration is in the process of moving its immigration system online, but we’re now at the halfway stage where you can apply for some types of cartes de séjour online, but others require a visit to your local préfecture.

Once you’ve been here for five (continuous) years, you’re eligible for long-term residency, which does away with the annual paperwork.

And if you have been here for five continuous years (or three years if you completed higher education in France) and speak good French, then you can apply for French citizenship – if you’re game for a whole lot more paperwork.

READ ALSO Am I eligible for French citizenship?

You can also find lots more information tailored to UK nationals in our Brits in France section.

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