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ENVIRONMENT

Atlantic salmon added to Norwegian list of threatened animals 

The Atlantic salmon, synonymous with Norway, has been added to a list of species that are endangered or threatened by extinction.

Pictured is an Atlantic salmon.
The Atlantic salmon, pictured, has been added to a list of species that are nearly engendered, endangered or extinct. Photo by William W. Hartley / USFWS / AFP

The wild Atlantic salmon has been added to the ‘red list’, a database of threatened, endangered and extinct species in Norway, for the first time after its population halved over the past 40 years.

The fish, an icon of Norway depicted on petroglyphs and featured heavily in Norse mythology, has been classified as “near threatened” on the red list, which is complied by the Species Data Bank, due to declining stocks. 

“The main reason the species is on the red list is that we have seen a decline,” Snorre Henriksen, senior advisor at the Species Data Bank, explained to public broadcaster NRK. 

Lice and diseases spread by escaped farmed salmon are considered the biggest reason for declining salmon stocks in Norway, according to the species monitor.

“Infections related to salmon farming are also a significant threat,” the Species Data Bank also wrote in its database entry on Atlantic salmon.

Between 1983 and 2019, the number of adult salmon returning from sea to spawning pools decreased by 51 percent. 

Another animal that conjures images of the Nordics, reindeer, is also set to be added to the red list. Encroachment onto reindeer habitats is seen as the factor affecting the species the most.

READ ALSO: Norwegian salmon farming moves to cleaner indoor waters

Henriksen said that the Species Data Bank has noticed climate change was beginning to threaten many species. 

“The big change is that many species are threatened by climate change. So it is a rather dramatic change since the last time (the list was updated),” the advisor said. 

In total, 333 species were added to the list, and 309 were removed. There are 2,752 species on the list, which has been updated for the first time since 2015. 

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ENVIRONMENT

Sweden to set world’s first consumption-based emissions target

Sweden political parties have unanimously backed the world's first consumption-based emissions target, with the country aiming to hit net zero by 2045.

Sweden to set world's first consumption-based emissions target

The committee responsible for setting Sweden’s environmental goals on Thursday presented its proposals for what goals Sweden should set for greenhouse has emissions linked to the country’s consumption. 

“No other country in the world has done what we have done,” Emma Nohrén, chair of the climate goals committee, said at a press conference announcing the goals. “There has been a pioneering sprit.” 

About 60 percent of the emissions caused by people living in Sweden are released in other countries producing goods to be consumed in Sweden, meaning Sweden’s production-based emissions goals, like those of other countries, arguably misrepresent Sweden’s impact.  

In a press statement, the government said that as well as the 2045 consumption emissions target, the committee has suggested setting targets for the climate impact of its exports, include emissions from flights and cargo ships in its long-term national climate goals, and aim to include emissions from internal flights in its target for domestic transport by 2030.  

The committee also proposes that emissions from goods and services ordered by the public sector should decline at a faster rate than those of the rest of the country. 

Amanda Palmstierna, an MP for the Green Party who sits on the committee, said it was positive that the new goals had the backing of all seven of Sweden’s parliamentary parties. 

“It’s important that all the parties are backing this proposal so that it can become implemented,” she said. “Significant action is required now. We have so little time, as we saw in the IPCC report which came out on Monday.”  

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