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New Danish rules make it easier to compare mortgages

New rules to be introduced on October 1st will see all banks and lenders be asked to include a standardised summary in their mortgage offers.

New Danish rules make it easier to compare mortgages
File photo: Mathias Bojesen/Ritzau Scanpix

The new summaries which lenders will be required to provide will include five key metrics which customers will be able to use as a basis for comparison, broadcaster DR reports.

Summaries will include the following five key details of mortgages:

  • The monthly repayment (before tax) for the first 12 months of the loan
  • The fee taken by the bank or financial institution for initialising the mortgage
  • How much customers will be paying in interest and fees to the lender during the first 12 months
  • The overall repayment for the entire mortgage
  • The interest and annual costs as a percentage

The Danish Competition and Consumer Authority (Konkurrence- og Forbrugerstyrelsen), a government agency, said that the purpose of the new requirement is to make it easier for consumers to compare offers and thereby increase competition on the housing market.

READ ALSO: ‘Prove you’re going to stay’: The challenges of buying a home in Denmark as a foreigner

“This is a market where customers often find it difficult to understand their loans and therefore take banks at their word,” the agency’s office manage Flemming Steen Nielsen told DR.

“Many customers do not thoroughly research the market and competition has therefore not been quite as well-functioning as one might like,” he added.

More understandable information would increase buyers’ interest in the market, encouraging them to look for more offers before making a decision, meaning lenders have to compete more for their custom.

“Prices and services for the consumer are thereby improved,” Nielsen said.

A number of schemes have previously been introduced to simplify the mortgage market for customers, but the new summary, which is introduced on October 1st, is the first to ensure all offers include a standardised summary with the same key figures.

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PROPERTY

What do foreigners need to know about buying a home in Denmark?

After several years of settling down in Denmark, it’s natural for foreign residents to think about buying a home. What’s worth knowing about getting on the property ladder as a non-Dane?

What do foreigners need to know about buying a home in Denmark?

For some foreign home buyers in Denmark, their first Danish home might not be the first home they have bought, and there will be a few differences in rules to take into account.

For others, Denmark might be the place where you take your first step onto the property ladder.

In either case, there are several rules and facets of the Danish housing market that are worth knowing when you set out.

I have savings, am a permanent resident in Denmark and want to buy a home. What should I do?

Unsurprisingly, the first step is to get approved for a mortgage or, in Danish kreditgodkendt.

“Then the thing to do is go down to a bank and get a købsbevis [mortgage certificate, ed.],” Mikkel Høegh, department director for real estate economics with Jyske Bank, told The Local via email.

“Here you will have a meeting at which you are pre-approved to buy a property up to a certain amount,” Høegh said.

The meeting, which takes place with an advisor from the bank, involves setting out a budget and looking at the applicant’s tax information to get an overview of their personal finances.

“Once you have been (approved) you can start house hunting,” he said.

The certificate is based on a calculation of “what amount you are in a position to buy a property for,” Lise Nytoft Bergmann, real estate economist and senior analyst with bank Nordea, told The Local.

House hunting can initially be done online, while buyers should talk with their families about how the see their future home, Bergmann advised.

“Whether it’s location that’s given highest priority, or the number of square metres, how modern a property… have these thorough conversations with the family about what you see as most important,” she said.

Are there any rules relating to buying a home that apply specifically to foreign nationals?

“There are no special rules for foreigners as such,” Høegh said.

Danish mortgages are based on the prices of the house being purchases, and buyers are approved to buy for that amount, he explained.

“The next step is then to find the property. When it’s been found, the property is what guarantees the loan. This means that the mortgage lender has a guarantee in the property. So it’s the property that is most important here,” he said.

“The buyer must pay at least 5 percent (of the price of the house) upfront,” he noted.

What if there’s a chance I might move back home (or somewhere else) in future? Should I still buy a house in Denmark?

“There some overheads which are connected to buying a house,” Bergmann said.

“They’re not entirely small, and so therefore it’s an advantage to spread these costs out over as many years as possible,” she said.

These include a registration fee which must be paid to the state of 1,750 kroner plus 0.6 percent of the purchasing price; and registration of the mortgage deed (pantebreve) of 1,730 kroner plus 1.45 percent of the purchase price.

Banks and mortgage lenders must usually also be paid for their work related to the purchase. This can include assessing the buyer for the mortgage certificate and for issuing it, valuing the property, and producing documentation as well as for consultancy. These costs can vary between financial institutions.

It may also be necessary to take advice from third parties such as lawyers, architects or electricians. The costs of actually moving, insurance and renovation must also be considered.

“We usually that you should have a timescale of a minimum of five years, and preferably longer,” Bergmann said in relation to staying in Denmark after buying a home.

What can I do to make sure I get the best mortgage offer?

“In Denmark the prices of mortgages are relatively similar and there is no difference between people and the price they are offered,” Høegh said.

“As such, what is important is finding a property that can be turned over, in other words you should keep in mind that another buyer must come after you,” he said.

“In addition to this, the price of the mortgage is related to how much of the loan is in the property. The more money you bring yourself [through the deposit, ed.], the cheaper it is to loan,” he said.

Both fixed and variable interest rate mortgages are available in Denmark, and the terms for these may stand out from what is available in other countries.

“A quite unique thing in Denmark is that you can get a fixed interest rate mortgage for 30 years. There are very few places in the world where you can do that, so when we say fixed rate we don’t just mean five or eight years,” Høegh said.

“Additionally, a mortgage in Denmark is such that the borrower can always go to market interest, so there is also nothing like a penalty interest which you see in other countries,” he said.

“Denmark has therefore an incredibly efficient mortgage system which everyone who buys a property has access to,” he said.

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