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RENTING

How much does it cost to rent a room in Spain in 2021?

Renting your own place can be expensive in Spain compared with average salaries, so many people cut costs by renting a room in a shared apartment. How much does it actually cost and where is sharing a flat cheapest in Spain?

How much does it cost to rent a room in Spain in 2021?
How much does it cost ro rent a room in Spain? Photo: Ina FASSBENDER / AFP

The average price for renting a room in a shared flat in Spain at the end of 2020 was 269.49 per month, according to Pisos.com. 

During the Covid-19 pandemic, however, rental prices have decreased rapidly. A study by Spanish property portal Idealista revealed that between May and November last year, Barcelona saw the sharpest fall in rents with prices per square metre slumping by 13 percent. 

READ ALSO: Where in Spain have rental prices dropped the most in coronavirus crisis?

According to the Rentger blog by Idealista, rental prices continued to fall in the first quarter of 2021 by 1.9 percent. 

But, it seems it’s not just the pandemic which has caused rents to decrease. In 2019, the average price for a room per month was 287.45 and in 2018 it was at 292.18, so it seems that prices were already on a downward trend. 

Where are the most expensive places to rent a room in Spain?

Unsurprisingly, Barcelona and Madrid are the two most expensive cities to rent a room in Spain. Pisos.com revealed that the average price for a room in Barcelona is 453.91 per month, while in Madrid it will set you back 426.88 per month on average.

This is mainly due to the fact that property is more expensive in these cities and the salaries are also higher. In fact, 43,78 percent of the demand for rooms in shared flats is in the provinces of Madrid and Barcelona.

READ ALSO – RANKED: Where are workers’ salaries highest and lowest in Spain?

READ ALSO: What you should know about renting an apartment in Barcelona

Other expensive cities to rent a room in Spain include places in the north of the country, particularly in the Basque Country, the Balearic Islands and Catalonia. Rooms in San Sebastián are the third most expensive at an average of 423.02 per month, while in Palma de Mallorca a room will cost you an average of 403.52 per month.

Where are the most expensive places to rent a room in Spain? Image: Pisos.com

Bilbao, Girona, Vitoria-Gasteiz and Las Palmas de Gran Canaria also all feature in the top 10 most expensive places to rent a room in Spain.

In Andalusia, the two most expensive cities to rent a room are Malaga and Cádiz at 316.74 and 305 respectively.

Where are the cheapest places to rent a room in Spain? 

On the other side of the scale, the cheapest places to rent a room in Spain can be found in the regions of Castilla-La Mancha, Galicia and Extremadura.

Ciudad Real in Castilla-La Mancha is the cheapest place to rent a room at an average of 157.24, followed by Lugo in Galicia at 167.95. Badajoz, Palencia, Cuenca and Ourense also all feature in the top 10 cheapest cities to rent a room in Spain.

Jaén is the cheapest city to rent a room in Andalusia at 201 per month.

Cheapest places to rent a room in Spain. Image: Pisos.com

Which places have the highest amount of shared flats available?

Barcelona and Madrid may be the most expensive places to rent a room in a shared flat, but they also have the highest amount of shared apartments available. In Barcelona, 14.45 percent of the apartments are shared, while in Madrid 13.94 percent of the apartments are shared. 

READ ALSO: Moving to Barcelona: A guide to the best neighbourhoods to live in

Valencia, Seville and Granada also have more flatshares available than other Spanish cities at 4.60 percent, 4.35 percent and 3.45 percent respectively. This is likely to be due to the fact that these cities have big student populations and are popular with foreigners coming to live in Spain for a few months to learn the language or experience living in another country. 

READ ALSO – Moving to Valencia: A guide to the best neighbourhoods to live in

Where is the greatest demand for room rentals in Spain? Image: Piso Compartido

Who is living in flatshares in Spain?

Also unsurprisingly, renting a room in a flatshare is more in demand among Spain’s younger population. 51.24 percent of those aged 18-25 are looking to rent a room, while 29.22 percent of those aged 26-35 want to rent one. There are also slightly more females looking for flatshares than males in Spain. 54.90 percent of those are female and 45.10 percent are male. 

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PADRON

Can I get my padrón online in Spain?

The padrón certificate is a handy multipurpose document you receive when you register with your local town hall in Spain. It can often be frustrating having to apply for it in person, so are you able to apply online instead?

Can I get my padrón online in Spain?

Empadronamiento is a registration process which adds you to the census of your local area. The associated certificate – el padrón – provides you with official proof of your address.  

For your local town hall, or ayuntamiento in Spanish, it serves the purpose of knowing exactly how many people are living in the area, which in turn helps them receive adequate funding for public services.  

But your padrón certificate is very useful for you too, as many official processes in Spain require you to prove your address.

For example, you may need it to get your driving licence or to register as an autónomo (self-employed). 

READ ALSO: 16 things you should know about Spain’s padrón town hall registration. 

Technically, you should apply for your padrón within the first three months of moving to Spain, or if you move home to a different area within Spain.

You may also need to reapply for it if you need it for another official process and it is older than three months.

If you’ve already been living in Spain, you’ll know that getting documents such as your padrón can take longer than you probably hoped for. This can be very frustrating, particularly having to first get a prior appointment (cita previa) from your town hall, as this ends up stringing out the process.

Being able to apply online instead of in person could save you a lot of time and should make the whole process easier, but is it possible?

Can you apply for the padrón online in Spain?

The short answer is yes, it is often possible to apply for your padrón certificate online. However, it may depend on the area you live in.

For example, if you live in Barcelona or Madrid, you are able to apply for your certificate for the first time online or renew it online too.

Those in Barcelona should visit the relevant page of the Ajuntament website here where you can fill out and submit the online form.

Those in Madrid can fill out and apply for the form here, while in Valencia, you can apply via the following link here.

You will simply need to follow all the steps, filling out all your personal details as you go and then submitting it at the end. 

Remember, you will also need to have digital copies of your ID documents such as passport, TIE or other residency cards, the deeds if you own the property where you live or your rental contract if you are renting.

You may need a digital certificate or [email protected] to be able to officially identify yourself during online processes, but this may not be necessary for all town halls, it will depend on what type of system they have set up.

For example, if you live in Granada and have your digital certificate, you can apply online, but if you don’t, then you will need to apply for it in person.

In Madrid, those who don’t have a digital certificate can apply for the padrón via e-mail.

In some other areas, you may be able to apply to renew your certificate online, but if you’re applying for the first time then you will still need to go in person.

As is so often the case with official matters in Spain, there is no standard procedure which applies across the board for getting a padrón online.

You may ask one civil servant who tells you it is possible, then turn round and quiz another funcionario, who completely rules it out. Perhaps you’re better off first Googling “solicitar padrón a través de internet” (apply for padron online), plus the name of your town to see if it is an option.

‘Spain is different’, Spaniards often say in English when being critical about their country. When it comes to applying for a padrón online, Spain and its 8,131 town halls most certainly are different.

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