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EU recommends tighter restrictions on American tourists as US removed from Covid safe travel list

The EU removed the US and five other countries from its travel safe list on Monday, meaning visitors, particularly those not vaccinated against Covid-19, could face tighter restrictions on travel to Europe. Individual member states can decide how to act.

EU recommends tighter restrictions on American tourists as US removed from Covid safe travel list
Photo: Valery Hache/AFP

The European Council announced on Monday that five countries and one territory have been removed from its recommended safe list of countries.

The countries and territories that were removed as of August 30th were Israel, Kosovo, Lebanon, Montenegro, the Republic of North Macedonia and the United States of America.

The latest move by the EU is however non-binding and individual member states are free to set their own border restrictions and quarantine rules when it comes to Covid, as they have done since the start of the pandemic.

Why has the US been removed?

The move follows a steep rise in Covid rates in both the US and Israel sparked by the spread of the more contagious Delta variant.

The EU Council bases its decision on “the epidemiological situation and overall response to COVID-19, as well as the reliability of the available information and data sources.”

It also takes into account reciprocity, in other words how countries treat travellers from EU countries.

In recent weeks there has been heightened pressure to remove the US from the list, not only due to rising Covid rates but also because the US still bars non-essential travel from European countries.

What does this mean in reality?

As stated above the EU’s list safe list for non-essential travel is non-binding meaning EU member states as well as Norway, Liechtenstein, Switzerland and Iceland are free to set their own rules for travel.

European countries may follow the EU’s lead and tighten restrictions such as quarantine measures or they could simply ignore the recommendation. Most EU countries reopened their border to travel from the US earlier in the summer in a bid to boost their tourism industry, but that was at a time when Covid rates in the US had plummeted.

Readers are recommended to keep a close eye on The Local’s individual country websites where any changes in travel rules will be reported on as soon as they are announced.

What does this mean for American travellers?

For vaccinated Americans nothing much should change, but it depends on where you’re travelling to as countries are allowed to set their own rules. 

The EU recommends that anyone vaccinated should be allowed to travel to Europe as long as they are vaccinated with an EU or WHO approved vaccine and had the last recommended dose at least 14 days before travel, as well as so-called “essential travellers” (see below) and all travellers from countries on the safe list, which includes the likes of Australia, New Zealand and China.

So the big change for travellers from the US to Europe – if countries follow up on the new recommendation – would be those who are not vaccinated and are travelling for “non-essential” reasons. But not all countries have separate rules for vaccinated and unvaccinated travellers.

The EU states that essential travel basically covers EU citizens and their families, EU residents and their families as well as “travellers with an essential function or need”.

It’s also worth pointing out that the US currently advises its citizens against travel to most European countries.

Which countries and territories remain on the list?

  • Albania
  • Armenia
  • Australia
  • Azerbaijan
  • Bosnia and Hercegovina
  • Brunei Darussalam
  • Canada
  • Japan
  • Jordan
  • New Zealand
  • Qatar
  • Republic of Moldova
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Serbia
  • Singapore
  • South Korea
  • Ukraine
  • China (plus Hong Kong and Macao)

The list is reviewed every two weeks.

Member comments

  1. Important to know if you are traveling to Italy as a non vaccinated US citizen; you will not be able to dine inside. You will need a Green Pass showing you are fully vaccinated to be able to do so. You will also not be permitted to enter a museum or any other public building. And as of September 1st you will not be allowed to travel on interregional trains or buses. They all require the same Green Pass. So if you do happen to be able to get here, there isn’t much you will be able to do.

    1. Heh, so they can “look but don’t touch” or eat in this case?? Good, cause their (anti-vaxx idiots) money isn’t worth another outbreak and preventable deaths; Nine times out of ten they’ll just make a scene at the restaurant anyway, complaining about how the food tastes like garbage (all they’re used to is sugary and salty junk), and then demand to see the manager to try and get out of paying for it. They make good fodder for YT videos but that’s about it, and even then it’s not worth it. Good on Italy and other countries that do the same.

  2. We two Americans are supposed to fly in four days on SAS from San Francisco to Copenhagen, non-stop, for a three week vacation in Denmark. We are fully Pfizer vaccinated more than fourteen days ago. We cannot get anyone, including SAS and the Danish consulate, to tell us if Denmark will let us into its wonderful country. Are we correct to presume Denmark will?

    1. David, according to the US Embassy & Consulate in the Kingdom of Denmark website “Effective June 5, the Danish government announced that fully vaccinated travelers from OECD countries – which includes the United States – may travel to Denmark, including for tourism. Travelers from the United States can enter Denmark if you have been vaccinated with a European Medicines Agency (EMA)-approved vaccine and it has been 14 days or longer since your last vaccine shot. Fully vaccinated travelers from the United States are also exempt from testing and quarantine requirements upon arrival in Denmark. You must present documentation that you are fully vaccinated which includes: your name, your date of birth, what disease you were vaccinated against, the vaccine name, your vaccination status, and the date of vaccination (both first and second dose if your vaccine had more than one dose). ”

      That was last updated August 30 2021, so it’s very recent and if you want to read the whole thing, here’s the website: https://dk.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen-services/security-and-travel-information/covid-19-information/

      Good luck, and I hope you can still make your trip. Goodness knows we all need one right about now.

  3. Why has the US been removed?? “Because half of the country are a bunch of anti-science/vaxx idiots, who believe that taking vitamins, injecting bleach, or the latest fad: taking anti-parasitic medication meant for livestock, will “cure” them of coronavirus.” “They’re also more scared of wearing a mask, than a virus that has killed well over 500,000 people here, and on track to reach a million by the end of the year.” There, I fixed that for you.

    In all seriousness though, OF COURSE the US was going to be either banned or put on a risk list, cause the writing was on the wall; it never left in the first place, so literally no one should be surprised at this point, and the money isn’t worth another outbreak.

    Also, I’m dead serious about people resorting to using livestock medication to try and “cure” coronavirus; it’s called Ivermectin, and it’s typically used to get rid of parasites like roundworms in livestock like cattle, and obviously it’s doing more harm than good, but the misinformation has spread so much here, that some prisons are using it as a “treatment”. Here’s some links to the articles in case you don’t believe me; I wouldn’t blame you since it sounds so insane, and prepare your sanity cause it’s about to be tested with stupid that’s amped up to 11: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/cdc-anti-parasite-drug-ivermectin-treat-prevent-covid-19/ (the story about Ivermectin)

    and the story on inmates in Arkansas given Ivermection as “coronavirus treatment”: https://www.npr.org/2021/09/02/1033586429/anti-parasite-drug-covid-19-ivermectin-washington-county-arkansas

  4. Well, this surprised absolutely NO ONE and if anything I’m surprised we (US) ever even left the risk list in the first place; if the news that people and some jails here are trying to use anti-parasitic medication to “treat” coronavirus, isn’t enough cause for concern then I don’t know what is. The medication in question is called Ivermectin, and is used to treat parasites like roundworms in livestock, and of course it’s not going well for people that use it…

    Here’s the story from NPR about how some jails are trying to use this for treating coronavirus: https://www.npr.org/2021/09/02/1033586429/anti-parasite-drug-covid-19-ivermectin-washington-county-arkansas

    and a story from CBS on how the CDC (Centers for Disease Control) are in an uphill battle warning people NOT to use this stuff. Prepare your sanity for a lot of stupid in these stories: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/cdc-anti-parasite-drug-ivermectin-treat-prevent-covid-19/

  5. Another important issue that I haven’t seen addressed anywhere is the fact that Covid survivors here in Italy don’t meet the vaccination requirement of some countries, like Canada. That’s because Italy is one of those countries (Switzerland’s another) that’s decided to only give one vaccine shot to Covid survivors, and Canada requires two shots from everybody, whether you’re a Covid survivor or not. Since we survivors here in Italy are not allowed a second shot (I’ve asked my doctor for one and he said he couldn’t), we’re pretty much stuck..!

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READER INSIGHTS

Readers reveal: The best beaches and coastal resorts in France

The Local asked readers for their top tips for places to visit along the French coast and we were overwhelmed with suggestions for beautiful beaches, off-the-beaten-track villages and lively resorts.

Readers reveal: The best beaches and coastal resorts in France

The Local has been seeking out France’s best coastline in recent weeks, after a disagreement on an episode of our Talking France podcast where Editor Emma Pearson defended La Vendée as home to the best (and most underrated) coastline in the country, while journalist Genevieve Mansfield fought for Brittany. 

To settle the debate, The Local asked its readers to share their favourite place to go on France’s shores, and the results are in, along with exclusive recommendations:

Brittany wins

Almost half (48 percent) of those who responded to The Local’s survey about the best part of France’s coastline voted for Brittany. 

Where to go

Several people recommended the Morbihan département.

Angela Moore, said her favourite part of this area was the islet between Vannes and Lorient, which is home to romanesque chapel and the Etel river oyster, a delicacy in the area. 

Others chose the Morbihan for its “lovely little coves, wonderful beaches and seafood,” as well as for boat rides in the gulf. Meanwhile, some pointed out Carnac, as a spot to visit, as the town is known for its prehistoric standing stones.

Some preferred travelling further north in Brittany, and they recommended the Finistère départment.

Rebecca Brite, who lives in Paris’ 18th arrondisement, said she loves this part of France for the overall atmosphere. Her top recommendation was to “Go all the way to the Baie des Trépassés and stay at the old, traditional hotel-restaurant of the same name. Pretend you’re in the legendary kingdom of Ys, swallowed up by the sea on this very site.”

The other part of Brittany that came highly recommended was the Emerald Coast (Côtes d’Armour) – specifically the Côte de Granit Rose.

The Mediterranean coastline

The Mediterranean remained a very popular vacation spot for readers of The Local, with almost a third of respondents claiming it as their favourite part of the French coastline. From sailing to cliffs and architecture, the Mediterranean had a bit of everything according to The Local’s readers.

Cassis and the Calanques were among of the most popular responses for where to go and what to see in this part of France.

One respondent, Gini Kramer, said she loves this part of France because “There’s nothing like climbing pure white limestone cliffs rising right out of the sea. The hiking is spectacular too.”

Some counselled more lively parts of the riviera, like the old port in Marseille, while others suggested the quieter locations.

David Sheriton said he likes to go to the beaches of Narbonne: “It’s a gentle slope into the sea so great for the (grand)children.” He said that the area does have a “few bars and restaurants” but that it does not “attract the party crowds.” 

In terms of beautiful villages, Èze came recommended for being home to “the most breathtaking views of the French coastline,” according to reader Gregg Kasner.

Toward Montpellier, Dr Lindsay Burstall said that La Grande Motte was worth visiting, for its “coherent 60’s architecture.” Burstall proposed having “a chilled pression au bord de la mer while watching the world go by…”

Meanwhile, three readers listed locations near Perpignan, and all encouraged visiting the area’s “pre-historic sites.”

Sally Bostley responded that her favourite areas were “between Canet-Plage and Saint-Cyprien-Plage” and she advised visiting “Collioure, Banyuls with the aquarium, Perpignan, nearby prehistoric sites, Safari Park, Prehistory Park.”

Other parts of the coastline

Though these locations may have received less votes overall, they still stood our in the minds of The Local readers:

Normandy did not receive as many votes as its neighbour Brittany, it is still home to unique attractions worth visiting. The WWII landing beaches “plages de débarquement” came highly recommended, along with cathedrals and abbeys in the region, like Coutances in the northern Manche département.

Reed Porter, who lives in Annecy, likes to go to Êtretat when he visits Normandy. He had several recommendations, starting with “les falaises!” These are the dramatic cliffs overlooking the ocean.

Porter also suggested visitors of Êtretat head to “the glass stone beach” and the “old town” for its architecture. If you get hungry, there are “oysters everywhere all the time.”

Basque country was also highlighted for its proximity to the Pyrenées mountains. Maggie Parkinson said this was the best part of France’s coastline for her because of “The long views to the Pyrénées, the pine forests, the soft, fresh quality of the air, the many moods and colours of the sea – gently lapping aquamarine waves to thunderous, crashing black rollers churning foam onto the shore.”

A huge fan of the area, Parkinson had several recommendations ranging from cuisine to “cycling the many paths through the tranquil pines, visiting Bayonne, the Basque Country and the Pyrénées or northern Spain (for wonderful pintxos).”

She said that she loves to “[chill] on the endless, wide sandy beaches or [rest] on a hammock in the park” or “[catch] a local choir sporting blue or red foulards singing their hearts out to traditional or rock tunes.”

Similar reasons were listed in favour of Corsica as France’s best coastline, as it is also home to tall mountains with beautiful views over the water.

If you are looking to visit Corsica, Paul Griffiths recommends “having a good road map” and then “just [driving] quietly along the coast and over the mountains.” He said that this is “all easily doable in a day” and along the way you can “find beautiful beaches, lovely towns with good restaurants – especially Maccinaggion and Centuri – to enjoy one day after another.”

Finally, the preferred coastline location for The Local’s France Editor, Emma Pearson, also got some support by readers, with one calling La Vendée an “unpretentious” and “accessible” place for a vacation.

Respondent Anthony Scott said that “Les Sables d’Olonne and Luçon both epitomise the spirit of Vendée.” He enjoys the “inland serenity and historic sites, beautiful beaches and inviting seashores” as well as “traditional appetising meals.” He also noted that the area is “not too expensive.”

READ ALSO Brittany v Vendée – which is the best French coastline?

Many thanks to everyone who answered our survey, we couldn’t include all your recommendations, but feel free to leave suggestions in the comments below.

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