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How to survive as a freelancer in Austria

Freelancing in Austria has a reputation for being tough, with high taxes and an expensive cost of living.

How to survive as a freelancer in Austria
Photo by Joseph Frank on Unsplash

It doesn’t mean working as a freelancer in the Alpine republic is a bad idea though – it just means there might be a few more hoops to jump through.

Here’s what you need to know about how to survive as a freelancer in Austria.

Get an accountant

Navigating the world of tax is confusing at the best of times. Throw in a foreign language and a new country and it can be overwhelming.

This is why hiring a tax accountant (Steuerberater) is a good idea for freelancers – especially for international residents or people without a high-level of German language skills.

EXPLAINED: What can I deduct from my tax bill in Austria?

Toni Krainz, a self-employed Business Development Engineer from Ireland, told The Local: “A tax advisor can give you some smart tips about your entitlements as a business owner, which more than cover the cost of hiring a Steuerberater.”

A tax account can also help with setting up health insurance, which is compulsory in Austria.

James Tibbles, from the UK, spent four years working as a freelance web developer when he first moved to Tyrol in Austria.

He said: “My tax advisor explained it all to me and picked out the correct one for my circumstances, so whenever I received a letter from them I just immediately passed it on to her.”

The downside of hiring a tax accountant is the cost. But in most cases the fees are worth the peace of mind when it comes to submitting a tax return or dealing with Austrian bureaucracy.

Find a way to lower expenses

Austria is well known for expensive living costs and freelancing has a reputation for sporadic work and payment – especially for those just starting out.

Put the two together and it can be a recipe for financial instability, but finding a way to lower expenses can significantly reduce stress for freelancers.

READ MORE: Cost of living: Seven tips to save money in Austria

A good starting point for staying on top of finances is to be honest about your expenses (rent, health insurance, food, bills) and identify areas where costs can be cut.

For example, working from home can save money otherwise spent while working in cafes, and joining a coworking space is usually much cheaper than renting an office.

Another option is downsizing or moving to a cheaper area to reduce living costs.

Even making smaller changes, such as shopping at Hofer (Austria’s Aldi), can save money on grocery bills each week.

In the end, all the small savings can add up to make a big difference.

Consider income protection insurance

Income insurance protection is exactly what it sounds like – payments to cover part of your income if you cannot work due to sickness or an accident.

This is especially useful for self-employed people and, according to other freelancers, should be considered to provide some extra financial security. 

Toni, from Ireland, said: “As a freelancer, you’re not entitled to sick pay so I highly recommend getting income protection insurance. 

“The fees are tax deductible and there are varying levels of cover available, so it doesn’t have to be expensive.”

Austria can be a great place to freelance. Photo by Galymzhan Abdugalimov on Unsplash

Learn German

Although many people in Austria speak English at a high level, it is still a German-speaking country. 

This means having German-language skills can be a big advantage for a freelancer – even for people with clients in different parts of the world.

READ MORE: Everything you need to know about becoming a freelancer in Austria

The reason for this is because bureaucracy and official communications in Austria are mostly conducted in German. 

So, even if all you can do is make a simple phone call or write an email in German, it will make life as a freelancer in Austria much easier. 

Network with other freelancers

In pre-corona times, freelancers could attend professional networking events to meet new people and scope out work opportunities.

However, the past 18 months has seen most events cancelled in the interests of public health, which means networking has moved online.

There are some advantages to this, such as the possibility to network with people from all over the world, not just in your region or country.

But the downside is it can be harder to forge strong professional relationships with others by only communicating online.

Despite the disadvantages to online networking, getting to know other freelancers in your industry is a great way to establish a local support network, and can even generate referrals for future business.

Essential websites for freelancers in Austria

Social insurance: sozialversicherung.at

Austrian Health Insurance Fund (ÖGK): gesundheitskasse.at

Austrian Federal Economic Chamber (WKO): wko.at

Self-employed information in English: self-employed.at

SVS (for self-employed insurance): svs.at

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LIVING IN AUSTRIA

How to dispose of unwanted furniture or whitegoods in Vienna legally

Got an unwanted mattress, fridge, or sofa? Here’s how you can legally get it off your hands in Vienna.

How to dispose of unwanted furniture or whitegoods in Vienna legally

If you find yourself with a large piece of furniture or big household appliance that has seen its prime and is not bound to the trashcan, then you might be wondering where to dispose of them – legally, that is.

Even if it is not uncommon to see furniture or appliances next to the big trashcans often placed near households and apartment complexes, it is illegal to leave them there.

Different cities have different methods – some will even pick up trash at specific times and places. To know how your city deals with bulky waste (Sperrmüll), you can google “Sperrmüll + the name of your city”.

READ ALSO: Why does Vienna’s waste department have a helicopter and a military plane?

Vienna has several waste collection points where you can leave bulky waste, electrical appliances, hazardous waste (in household quantities) and other old goods for no charge.

The use of the Wiener Mistplätze is subject to certain quantity limits and requirements, but they are to avoid industrial use. Therefore, most households will have no problem with the limitations.

Here you can find several collection points in Vienna.

It is worth pointing out that delivery to those sites can only be made by cars with Viennese license plates, on foot or by bicycle. Furthermore, no trailers or company cars are allowed to leave trash at these collection points.

What can you bring to the collection centres?

This is the place to bring large sheets of plastic foil, bulky or large metal parts and electrical appliances, for example.

Additionally, you can bring small amounts of bulky waste, wood, styrofoam, large cardboard boxes, green waste and used tires to any waste collection centres.

Depending on what you are disposing of, you might need to go to the Rinter centre, one of the larger ones.

READ ALSO: Hasta la mista, baby? How to vote for your favourite Vienna trash can joke

The centres also have a separate division where it is possible to donate old items still in good condition, the so-called 48er-Tandler-Box.

Tableware, small furniture, electrical appliances, clothes, toys and other items can be reused and bought at a low price at the 48er-Tandler reuse shop.

Most centres are open only from Monday to Friday during business hours, but others are also available on Saturdays.

What to do if I don’t have a car?

If you don’t need a car but still need to dispose of a large appliance, the Viennese solution varies.

Some will take public transport with a couple of friends trying to help them carry an old sofa via the u-bahn, although that can get a little tough at peak hour. 

Alternatively, you can borrow or rent a vehicle to try and save costs.

READ ALSO: The downsides of Vienna you should be aware of before moving there

But Vienna City also has a service that will pick up the trash for a low fee – even if it is located in the attic, a basement or a courtyard.

It’s the Entrümpelungsdienst und Sperrmüllabfuhr der MA 48. You can also ask for the “dump service” when the city of Vienna brings a trough (the smallest can fit 12 cubic meters).

Once you fill it up, they will remove it and take it to the appropriate place.

Costs will depend on the amount of trash, the size of the appliance, and where in the household it is located.

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