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Today in Denmark: A roundup of the latest news on Monday

Find out what's going on in Denmark today with The Local's short roundup of the news in less than five minutes.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the latest news on Monday
A file photo of people enjoying hot weather at Bellevue Strand beach near Copenhagen. Photo: Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix

Mohammed cartoonist Kurt Westergaard dies aged 86

Danish artist Kurt Westergaard, famed for drawing a caricature the Prophet Mohammed which sparked outrage around the Muslim world, has died at the age of 86.

The illustrator was behind 12 drawings published by conservative newspaper Jyllands-Posten in 2005 under the headline “The Face of Mohammed”, one of which sparked particular anger.

During the last years of his life Westergaard, like a number of others associated with the cartoons, had to live under police protection at a secret address.

Here’s our report.

Norway tightens travel restrictions for Denmark residents

Norway’s Covid-19 restrictions for incoming travel from Denmark are increased as of today, with the exception of people from the Southern Denmark health authority region.

That means people travelling from Denmark to Norway will be required to quarantine for ten days. Norway’s mandatory quarantine can be ended early by testing negative for the coronavirus with a PCR test after seven days.

However, fully vaccinated people or people who have recovered from coronavirus within the last six months can still travel from Denmark to Norway without being encompassed by the travel restrictions.

Denmark has seen an increase in coronavirus infections since the beginning of July. The Danish foreign ministry has changed its own guidance on travel to Norway as a result of the new Norwegian restrictions, effectively making Norway an orange country for all Danish residents except for those in Southern Denmark.

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Escaped python on the loose in Aarhus 

A python which escaped from its cage in Aarhus on Saturday is still on the loose, East Jutland police confirmed to broadcaster DR early this morning.

According to the daily report published by the police district on its website, the snake broke free area after its owner moved the its cage onto outside decking at his home in the Risskov area of the city.

The snake in question is a one-metre-long python. It is not poisonous and does not bite ‘in normal circumstances’, according to the police report.

Sightings of the python should be reported using the 114 police contact number.

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

The potential for a new Danish prime minister, more people on the 'poor payers' list, and the kickoff to Copenhagen Fashion Week are among the top news stories in Denmark this Tuesday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

Frederiksen could call for election as early as next week 

A new opinion poll from Voxmeter by news agency Ritzau gives the Social Democrats, prime minister Mette Frederiksen’s party, their worst showing since 2015. 

Pressure is mounting for the Social Democrats to call for an election as the ‘blue bloc’ — anchored by the Liberal party (Venstre) and the Conservative People’s Party (De Konservative) — command 50 percent of the vote according to the latest poll. Meanwhile, the ‘red bloc’ holds just 47.5 percent. 

The Social Liberals (De Radikale), also of the red bloc, have demanded that Frederiksen hold elections by October at the latest. (Legally, the next general election can take place as late as June 4th, 2023.) 

Analysts say Frederiksen could call for an election as early as next week, when the Social Democrats convene for their summer group meeting. 

READ MORE: A foreigner’s guide to understanding Danish politics in five minutes

‘Hacker attacks’ keep 7-Eleven shuttered (with a few exceptions) 

The vast majority of Denmark’s 176 7-Eleven convenience stores remain hamstrung on Tuesday after what is believed to be a cyber attack on Monday. However, you’ll still be able to pick up GLS packages at ‘closed’ stores, and five capital-area stores can now accept purchases through MobilePay and cash. 

The reopened stores are at Rigshosital, Vesterbrogade, Lyngby Storcenter, and Gammel Kongevej in Copenhagen. Another at the Buddinge Station is Søborg is also back in action. 

READ MORE: Danish convenience stores closed by suspected cyber attack 

More ‘poor payers,’ but less average debt 

Denmark’s largest list of debtors — the RKI, or Riber’s credit information, run by Experian — has increased for the first time since 2014. 

The list is up a very modest 0.5 percent in the last six months, but Experian analysts expect that number to climb before the end of the year. 

“The whole world situation is a bit shaky at the moment,” says Experian director Bo Rasmussen. “War, inflation and rising prices everywhere have an effect on people’s private finances, so you don’t have the same leeway as you did one or two years ago.” 

Just under 172,000 Danes are registered on the RKI after being reported for not paying bills. Appearing on the registry can make it harder to rent an apartment, get a job, or even a mobile phone. 

On the upside, the average person on the RKI owes about 55,000 kroner in unpaid bills, down from about 65,000 kroner last year. 

READ MORE: Boligstøtte: Who can claim Denmark’s national rent subsidy? 

Copenhagen Fashion Week dawns 

Tuesday marks the beginning of Copenhagen Fashion Week, when buyers from all over the world gather to see Danish designers present their newest wares. 

Industry analysts aren’t bullish about the event’s prospects, though, according to broadcaster DR. After a record-breaking 45.1 billion kroner year for Danish fashion companies in 2021, the war in Ukraine and dwindling consumer confidence is likely to mean fewer sales and zero growth. 

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