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What you need to know about sending post between Germany and the UK after Brexit

As of December 31st 2020, when the Brexit transition period officially ended, the cost of sending packages between Germany and the UK went up, and there's more paperwork involved. Here's what you need to know.

What you need to know about sending post between Germany and the UK after Brexit
A DHL delivery worker in Halle. Photo: DPA

Many residents in Germany may have already noticed a difference when they have tried to post a package to the UK recently – or if they’ve received something from Britain.

That’s because the rules changed after the Brexit transition period ended at the start of this year, and the UK left the single market and customs union.

All types of parcels – whether commercial or private – are affected by changes to postal rules that came into force on January 1st 2021.

VAT and duty costs

The new rules could mean that you have to pay extra VAT and duties.

The taxes can be imposed when you order goods from the UK, if you send a package to the UK, or if friends and family in the UK send you a package in Germany. Typically, you have to pay the fees before you’re allowed to pick the item up at the post, delivery office or online.

According to the UK government website: “Most goods arriving in the UK are liable to any or all of the following taxes: Customs Duty, Excise Duty and Import VAT”.

If you are sending a gift from Germany to the UK, import VAT typically only applies to goods where the value is over £39, or the equivalent in Euros. Customs Duty is due only if the value of the goods cost over £135.

Residents in Germany will need to pay customs or VAT charges and a handling fee before they can claim the parcel. These charges will depend on the value of the item and whether it is a gift or not.

‘Complete nightmare’

Another issue that many UK residents in Germany have already noticed are the higher delivery costs.

Thanks to the UK no longer falling within the EU postal zone, sending a parcel to friends or family back home is a lot more expensive.

In Germany, for example, delivery firm DHL has now moved the UK into a new zone alongside Switzerland, with the price for sending small to medium packages rising from €4 to €10. The cost of posting a larger parcel used to be up to 5kg used to be €15.99 – and now it’s €26.90.

When you’re sending items, you also have to fill out a customs declaration form. 

“I sent a parcel to England from Berlin with DHL in January and it was a complete nightmare,” Alice, 30, a reader based in Berlin told The Local.

“I know it was more of a nightmare after the Brexit transition ended because I sent a similar parcel home for Christmas.

“The first frustrating thing is you have to do a customs declaration. It feels like preparing a parcel for Australia or something like that. It seems silly because the UK is right there.”

The customs declaration form, which you can get at the post office, has to include information about the contents of your package.

“You have to write down the weight of each item and how much it cost,” Alice said. “If it’s more expensive than a certain amount of money, the person at the other end receiving the package needs to pay customs duties on it. 

“I found it annoying because if it’s for a present it’s not great that you have to list everything on the outside of the parcel.”

And as we mentioned, the costs to send something home are now much higher.

“It’s much more expensive,” Alice said. “I sent a package of a similar weight – or probably slightly heavier – from Germany to England before the Brexit transition and I paid €18.
 
“After the Brexit transition I paid €30 to send a parcel and it was lighter.
 
“It’s a significant price difference and will be a bit of a deterrent to sending stuff home – that’s in addition to having to do all this customs stuff.”

Some people have raised concerns about mail taking longer to arrive.

This could be connected to the travel bans against Covid-19 variants that were put in place in December.

But delays could also be linked to businesses and individuals adapting to the new rules, plus the extra customs processes.

What else should you know?

Importing products derived from an animal into the EU from a Third Country (which is what the UK now is) is a complicated process and the rules apply to both businesses and individuals.

On the business side, our sister site the Local France saw shortages of fresh food in the Paris branches of Marks & Spencer, which imports its sandwiches and ready meals from the UK, due to the complicated process of obtaining veterinary certificates on all meat, dairy, eggs and other animal-derived products.

The EU’s strict sanitary rules mean that all imports of animal derived products – even just a packet of home-made fudge from your mum – technically come under these rules.

Known as Personal Imports (which also covers items that you bring back in your luggage after a trip to the UK) these have some exemptions including limited amounts of baby milk, food required for medial reasons or limited amounts of honey and certain fish products – find more information here.

Parcels that contain banned animal products can be seized and destroyed at the border.

You can also check out this extensive (and frankly, a little intimidating) information sheet on what people in the UK are allowed to send to Germany.

Member comments

  1. “The first frustrating thing is you have to do a customs declaration. It feels like preparing a parcel for Australia or something like that. It seems silly because the UK is right there.”

    Find it incredible that anyone is surprised. That’s what happens sending to ANY Country outside the EU, whatever the distance!

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BREXIT

‘It’s their loss’: Italian universities left off UK special study visa list

The UK is missing out by barring highly skilled Italian graduates from accessing a new work visa, Italy's universities minister said on Wednesday.

'It's their loss': Italian universities left off UK special study visa list

Universities and Research Minister Cristina Messa said she was disappointed by the UK’s decision not to allow any graduates of Italian universities access to its ‘High Potential Individual’ work permit.

“They’re losing a big slice of good graduates, who would provide as many high skills…it’s their loss,” Messa said in an interview with news agency Ansa, adding that Italy would petition the UK government to alter its list to include Italian institutions.

Ranked: Italy’s best universities and how they compare worldwide

“It’s a system that Britain obviously as a sovereign state can choose to implement, but we as a government can ask (them) to revise the university rankings,” she said.

The High Potential Individual visa, which launches on May 30th, is designed to bring highly skilled workers from the world’s top universities to the UK in order to compensate for its Brexit-induced labour shortage.

Successful applicants do not require a job offer to be allowed into the country but can apply for one after arriving, meaning potential employers won’t have to pay sponsorship fees.

Students sit on the steps of Roma Tre University in Rome.

Students sit on the steps of Roma Tre University in Rome. Photo by TIZIANA FABI / AFP.

The visa is valid for two years for those with bachelor’s and master’s degrees and three years for PhD holders, with the possibility of moving into “other long-term employment routes” that will allow the individual to remain in the country long-term.

READ ALSO: Eight things you should know if you’re planning to study in Italy

Italy isn’t the only European country to have been snubbed by the list, which features a total of 37 global universities for the 2021 graduation year (the scheme is open to students who have graduated in the past five years, with a different list for each graduation year since 2016).

The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, EPFL Switzerland, Paris Sciences et Lettres, the University of Munich, and Sweden’s Karolinska Institute are the sole European inclusions in the document, which mainly privileges US universities.

Produced by the UK’s Education Ministry, the list is reportedly based on three global rankings: Times Higher Education World University Rankings, the Quacquarelli Symonds World University Rankings, and The Academic Ranking of World Universities.

Messa said she will request that the UK consider using ‘more up-to-date indicators’, without specifying which alternative system she had in mind.

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