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Working in Germany: how to build your personal network

Working in Germany: how to build your personal network

 

Germany is one of the world’s most vibrant, exciting and innovative places to work as an international professional. Yet many of those who come to work in Germany find it a challenge to create the kind of professional networks that allow them to flourish. 

The consequences of pandemic restrictions, as well as differences in workplace culture, can make many international professionals feel isolated and out of touch with peers.

Together with the Quantic School of Business and Technology and their mobile MBA and Executive MBA programs, we discuss how global programs such as Quantic’s can help professionals network and thrive in Germany and in German-speaking nations.

 

Practice your German

While English proficiency in Germany has improved greatly over the last two decades, you will find that some of the most interesting and fruitful connections can be made if you have at least a basic understanding of German.

There is a bustling ecosystem of apps such as Duolingo and Babble that can help you improve your German, yet one of the most effective ways to develop proficiency is through practice. 

Quantic’s alumni network offers students the opportunity to identify users close to them who they can not only build a professional relationship with, but also practice the kind of conversational German that will allow their career to thrive. 

Additionally, while a student, you’ll connect virtually on group projects and case studies, with the option to meet at our exclusive MBA conferences hosted in major international cities (with an upcoming conference in Berlin this October).

In 2021 Quantic held over 300 virtual events and multiple events in Germany where students can connect with peers and practice their German language skills. Even before graduation, you’ll get the full power of our alumni network, connecting with thousands of the brightest minds around the world.

Use Quantic’s English-language learning platform to make professional connections today as part of their mobile MBA and Executive MBA programs. Enrol by March 10 for the next intake

Quantic students at a recent conference in Copenhagen. Photo: Quantic

Target your efforts

Choosing where and how you connect with others in Germany is crucial to success when networking with other professionals.

The German federal government’s Make It In Germany website is an invaluable resource for those who want to make professional connections. There are always new events and opportunities to connect through the site and it is updated frequently.

Websites such as Xing also serve as German equivalents to LinkedIn, helping professionals connect with one another. 

On another level, location matters. Different regions and cities have very different specialities in terms of industry, business and research.

If you’re a media professional, for example, Dusseldorf is the place to be. Berlin’s startup scene is one of the world’s most exciting. Frankfurt is the centre of not only business, but publishing. Munich is a scientific and educational powerhouse, and if engineering or automotive technology is your focus, then Stuttgart is the place to be.

With Quantic you get a head start with direct access to hundreds of highly successful professionals all over Germany and German-speaking countries Berlin is the major metropolitan alumni centre, while the states of Nordrhein-Westfalen, Hesse, Rheinland-Pfalz and Baden-Württemberg are all represented by hundreds of students who work for such industry leaders as Google and Amazon. Meetups and conferences in Berlin have also proved to be a success for networkers thus far.

On another level, knowing the kind of organisations to follow on a local level is also important. Every major city and town will have an IHK, or ‘Industrie- und Handelskammer‘ (Chamber of Industry & Commerce) that hosts meetups, conferences, hackathons and discussion forums, bringing local professionals together. Such events are a very valuable resource for any new arrival. 

 

Know the culture

Every country has its own distinct culture – some of which give rise to exaggerated stereotypes abroad. In this regard, Germany is no different.

However, it’s important to understand what German-speaking professionals value in their networks. This will allow most effective communication and smoother relationship-building.

Organisation, punctuality and plain-speaking are, generally, more highly-prized by German professionals than showiness or over-friendliness.

Being direct and clear about your expectations in establishing new professional relationships is by far the most effective way in face-to-face meetings.

Gain an insight into German professional culture through Quantic’s award winning mobile-first MBA and Executive MBA programs, and their ever-growing alumni network. Discover more about the programs now – applications for the next cohorts close March 10th

A glimpse of Quantic's alumni network. Photo: Quantic

Try Quantic

Quantic’s highly-acclaimed mobile MBA and Executive MBA programs allow you to skip many of the challenges associated with building professional relationships in Germany.

The smartphone-based program not only gives students a world-class education in modern business thought, but utilizes ‘Active Learning’ to make sure that students are engaged and working with the content in real-life contexts. 

Many online educational tools rely on traditional lecture-based learning and video presentations by professors. If you feel this isn’t what you need to boost your career in the 2020s, you’re not alone.

Interactive app-based learning is different. You’ll be prompted to engage with the material about every eight seconds, plus you’ll get instant feedback to help you learn from any mistakes you make.

Quantic’s innovative program has demonstrated that it supercharges the careers of participating students. 66% of students see a salary increase within six months of grduating, with an average salary increase of 23%. Furthermore 94% of students say that the course helped them achieve their career goals.

Quantic’s Executive MBA also unlocks an ongoing series of online and virtual events in Germany, bringing like-minded professionals together to meet, build connections and collaborate. Upon completion, students can even be recruited by leading companies that are a part of the program’s ‘Flipped Learning’ approach.

Toyosi Odukoya, Head of Business Intelligence at the Mastercard Foundation speaks about her experience with the Quantic network: “We have many opportunities to connect and learn, and build the right relationships.”

Most importantly, Quantic students gain access to an alumni platform that allows professionals to establish connections quickly and efficiently across not only Germany, but the world, for life. Users can understand at a glance the skillsets of various alumni, and communicating with past students couldn’t be easier – everyone appearing on the platform is open to connecting, more so than on LinkedIn and other professional platforms.

Tom Adams, Co-Founder and Chief Product Officer at Quantic states: “It’s not enough for a program to offer flexibility and mobility; the students must be talented and ambitious and there must be tangible positive outcomes for graduates.”

To learn more about how students find value in Quantic’s MBA programs, read about the experiences of Katja Smith of Google, and Luciano Bottoni of Capgemini Englneering

Quantic’s mobile-first MBA and Executive MBA programs are your key to developing powerful professional networks across Germany and the world. Enrol today and access one of Europe’s most effective alumni networks – apply by March 10 for the next cohort

 

BUSINESS

Deutsche Bank offices raided in money-laundering probe

Investigators searched the offices of Germany's biggest lender Deutsche Bank on Friday, prosecutors said, with the focus on the bank's anti-money-laundering activities.

Deutsche Bank offices raided in money-laundering probe

Officers from the BKA federal police, the financial watchdog BaFin and the prosecutor’s office in Frankfurt had been “deployed” to the scene, they said.

The raid was linked to “suspicious activity reports filed by the bank” in relation to money-laundering, Deutsche Bank said in a statement, adding that it was cooperating with authorities.

Financial newspaper Handelsblatt said investigators were probing a transaction carried out several years ago involving Rifaat al-Assad, the uncle of Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad.

READ ALSO: Deutsche Bank to pay $130m to settle US bribery probes

Although Assad did not have an account with Deutsche Bank, the institution is said to have distributed money to the Assad family as part of a technical agreement with other banks, the paper reported.

Deutsche Bank has in recent years been closely watched by financial authorities in relation to suspicious transactions.

BaFin in 2021 called on management at the lender to redouble their efforts to tackle money-laundering activities. Investigators searched Deutsche Bank’s headquarters in 2019 for failing to report possibly illicit money flows.

READ ALSO: German police raid Deutsche Bank in ‘Panama Papers’ graft probe

The Frankfurt-based group also came under scrutiny for its role as a correspondence bank that handled foreign transactions for Danske Bank’s Estonian branch, at the centre of a €200-billion ($212-billion) money-laundering affair between 2007 and 2015.

Deutsche Bank subsequently agreed to pay a fine of €13.5 million for failing to report suspicious activity quickly enough, after an investigation by Frankfurt prosecutors.

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