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POLITICS

Could 1 and 2 cent euro coins soon be scrapped?

If you hate carrying pocketfuls of the tiny one and two cent euro coins then you'll be in favour of what the European Commission is planning to do.

Could 1 and 2 cent euro coins soon be scrapped?
AFP/ECDC

Brussels is considering a new rule to round off all prices to the nearest 5 cents, which would mean phasing out the small, brown one and two cent coins.

On Monday, the Commission opened a 15-week public consultation on the use of the small coins.

After consultation, the Commission will consider the possibility of putting forward a new law at the end of next year which would introduce uniform EU-wide rules for rounding off cash payments to the nearest 5 cents

“EU rules on euro coins state that the EU institutions should periodically examine the use of different denominations of euro coins in terms of costs and public acceptability,” the consultation said.

The commission “will carefully study the economic, environmental and social consequences of introducing uniform rounding rules,” it said on Monday.

Ordinary citizens and institutions are invited to share their opinions and suggestions on the issue of whether prices should be rounded off and the small coins ditched.

Citizens are invited to leave feedback on the Commission's website. A quick look at the comments suggests opinions were divided.

One commenter from France wrote: “I am in favour of removing the 1 and 2 cent coins. They are expensive to produce, to transport, and clutter up purses without providing any real service. In addition, these “small” coins seem to me all the less necessary as card and contactless payments have increased significantly (especially since the Covid epidemic).”

However another respondent summed up the views of many who though a rounding off of prices would simply mean a rounding up of prices at the expense of consumers.

“Abolishing 1 and 2 cent coins will most likely result in another rounding up of prices concerning mostly consumer goods, which will make day-to-day life even more expensive, whilst wages have not risen and are in the future unlikely to increase at the same rate,” wrote the anonymous commenter.

“Hence, the standard of living is progressively decreasing. Now that cannot possibly be, nor should it be, the aim of the European Union.”

 

Member comments

  1. No need to phase them out. Just make automated vending and coffee machines accept them.
    Very annoying that most of these don’t accept anything below the 5 cent coin.

  2. I think it’s better to abolish these two coins. One main reason to abolish it which would benefit the consumer is that there would be no more psychological pricing, instead of 99,99 it would make 100 or 99,95 . Good for us actually.

  3. …..because retailers have always put the consumer first and rounded prices down to benefit the consumer and reduced their profits, haven’t they?

  4. We had 1c and 2c coins in Australia and both coins were withdrawn from circulation in 1992 and nobody missed them. So many people now use cards anyway, so don’t see why they are needed. I generally come home with heaps of these after holidaying in Europe.

  5. When I lived in Belgium in pre-Euro days, there were far more Belgian francs than French francs per £ and the coins went down to 1/4 and 1/2 cents. Final bills were always rounded up or down, but the actual prices of goods still showed these small denominations. Only the final total was rounded, so 3 items at 4.45 would come to 13.35 and be charged as 13 francs, or at 4.85, making 14.55 would be charged as 15 francs. Seemed reasonable to me.

  6. When I lived in Belgium in pre-Euro days, there were far more Belgian francs than French francs per £ and the coins went down to 1/4 and 1/2 cents. Final bills were always rounded up or down, but the actual prices of goods still showed these small denominations. Only the final total was rounded, so 3 items at 4.45 would come to 13.35 and be charged as 13 francs, or at 4.85, making 14.55 would be charged as 15 francs. Seemed reasonable to me.

  7. They haven’t been using the 1c & 2c in Italy for quite some time now – rounding off to the nearest 5c.
    Keep up France….

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ECONOMY

Spain unveils €9 billion plan to tackle Ukraine fallout

The national aid plan will help the country weather the ongoing fallout of the conflict in Ukraine.

Spain unveils €9 billion plan to tackle Ukraine fallout

Spain’s government on Saturday unveiled a €9 billion national aid plan to help the country weather the ongoing fallout of the conflict in Ukraine.

Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez unveiled the package in Madrid which comes on the heels of a €6 billion injection in March for a scheme worth €15 billion overall, or “more than one GDP percentage point”.

The government also extended other measures taken in March and set to end on June 30 by another six months till the end of the year. Those include reducing the price of a litre of petrol by 20 euro cents.

For the second time in less than a year, it also reduced value-added tax on electricity from 10 to 5 percent, a move already announced by Sánchez earlier this week.

It decided to hand out “direct aid of €200” to the self-employed and unemployed, and increase pensions and disability benefits by 15 percent.

The measures aim to help consumers deal with rising inflation, which hit 8.7 percent in May, its highest level in decades.

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