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Ten German abbreviations that will have you texting like a true native

The modern, simple syntax of text speak is a ‘Handy’ method of communication to cut down time on the complexities of language and to impress your native German friends.

Ten German abbreviations that will have you texting like a true native
Photo: DPA

Notorious for its long compound nouns and complex grammatical system, the German language often receives a bad rap as being difficult to perfect.

However, with the ever-expanding world of social media and smartphones, the language is continually adapting. 

Both Kurzdeutsch (short German) and Netzjargon (internet slang) are on the rise, in line with the ever-expanding, fast-paced world of technology and instant messaging.

READ ALSO: ‘Short German’ text speak spares you from grammar

Our short guide to German text speak will have you chatting online like a local in no time.

Photo: DPA

Bd – Bis dann (‘until then’)

A useful phrase that is an equivalent of ‘see you later’.

kD – kein Ding (‘no problem’) 

Literally meaning ‘no thing’, this phrase can be used when you need to say that something is no bother or no issue.

kA – keine Ahnung (‘no idea’)

An all-important phrase for learners of the tricky German language, kA can stand for ‘keine Ahnung’, or ‘no idea’.

LG – Liebe Grüße (‘Best wishes’ / ‘Kind regards’)

This abbreviation is often used as a sign off at the end of a text message.

vlt/vllt – vielleicht (‘maybe’, ‘possibly’)

A shortened version useful for expressing uncertainty. Germans also use evt or evtl (short for ‘eventuell’) for the same purpose. 

WE – Wochenende (‘weekend’)

This is a helpful phrase to arrange plans or express excitement for that Friday feeling – ‘Wochenende’ is the German word for weekend.

nix – nichts (‘nothing’)

Commonly seen on social media, Germans often shorten the word ‘nichts’ to ‘nix’ online.

Gn8 – Gute Nacht (‘goodnight’)

Perhaps a little outdated now, the German word for the number eight, ‘acht’, can be used in text language to form whole words, similarly to the English use of ‘gr8’.

IRL – im richtigen Leben (‘in real life’)

Equivalent to the English ‘IRL’, this abbreviation is used to denote something in the real world, rather than in the digital one.

hdl – Hab dich lieb (‘love you lots’)

Commonly used among family and close friends, this initialism is used to express love. For a romantic partner, you might see ild (‘Ich liebe dich’ – I love you).

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ITALIAN WORD OF THE DAY

Italian expression of the day: ‘Qualcosa non torna’

Does this phrase add up to you?

Italian expression of the day: 'Qualcosa non torna'

Ever get the feeling that things aren’t quite right, that perhaps you’re missing something, that something fishy might be going on?

In Italian you can express that with the phrase qualcosa non torna (‘qual-KOH-zah-non-TORR-na’).

Qualcosa you’ll probably recognise as meaning ‘something’, and non of course here means ‘doesn’t’, so the slight wild card for anglophones is the verb torna.

That’s because tornare means ‘to return’ in most contexts – but it can also mean to balance, to add up.

Ho calcolato le spese, il conto torna.
I added up the costs, the bill checks out.

I conti dell’azienda tornano.
The company’s accounts add up.

The Math Seems To Check Out! GIF - The House Will Ferrell The Math Seems To Check Out GIFs

The word can also refer more nebulously to something sounding or feeling right – or not.

Secondo me c’è qualche parte del mio discorso che ancora non torna.
I think there are parts of my speech that still aren’t quite right.

And when something doesn’t torna – that’s when you know things are off. It’s the kind of expression you’re likely to hear in detective shows or true crime podcasts. 

Qualcosa non torna nel loro racconto.
Something about their story’s off.

C’è solo una cosa che non torna.
There’s just one thing that doesn’t add up.

It’s similar to how we can talk in English about someone’s account of an event not ‘squaring’ with the facts, and in fact you can also use that metaphor in Italian – qualcosa non quadra (‘qual-KOH-zah-non-QUAHD-ra’) – to mean the same thing as qualcosa non torna.

Trash Italiano Simona Ventura GIF - Trash Italiano Simona Ventura Qualcosa Non Quadra GIFs

You can adjust either phrase slightly to say ‘things don’t add up’, in the plural: this time you’ll want le cose instead of qualcosa, and to conjugate the tornare or the quadrare in their plural forms.

Ci sono molte cose che non tornano in quest’affare.
There are a lot of things about this affair that don’t add up.

Le loro storie non quadrano.
Their stories don’t square.

You can also add pronouns into the phrase to talk about something seeming off ‘to you’ or anyone else.

La sua storia ti torna?
Does his story add up to you?

C’è qualcosa in tutto questo che non mi torna.
There’s something about all this that doesn’t seem right to me.

alfonso qualcosa non mi torna GIF by Isola dei Famosi

The next time something strange is afoot, you’ll know just how to talk about it in Italian. Montalbano, move aside…

Do you have an Italian word you’d like us to feature? If so, please email us with your suggestion.

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