Netherlands lifts quarantine guidelines for (most) visitors from Sweden

Netherlands lifts quarantine guidelines for (most) visitors from Sweden
Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport. Photo: AP Photo/Peter Dejong
Most travellers from Sweden are no longer being urged to self-quarantine when they visit the Netherlands, after Dutch authorities lifted their restrictions for all regions except one.

The Netherlands now classifies almost all of Sweden as 'yellow', with the exception of the Västra Götaland region which remains 'orange', meaning travellers from there are strongly advised to quarantine.

But anyone from Sweden's other 20 regions are no longer told to spend 14 days in quarantine when visiting the Netherlands, and Dutch residents visiting Sweden don't need to isolate on returning.

Self-quarantine can be done at home or a hotel. Quarantine is only “strongly advised”, and people visiting for certain reasons, for example urgent travel for family reasons such a funeral, are not asked to quarantine.

Face masks are mandatory on public transport in the Netherlands, but there is otherwise no general face mask requirement in the country. However, anyone visiting should be aware that local authorities are allowed to set their own rules, and anyone over the age of 13 who fail to respect the rules could receive a fine of €95.

There is no face mask requirement in Sweden, although some venues – for example most airports and the Karolinska Institutet university – have introduced their own guidelines on face masks. All visitors are expected to follow health and safety guidelines, such as keeping a distance and avoiding public transport if possible.

Sweden's foreign ministry's advice against non-essential travel to the Netherlands is currently in place until August 26th, although it could in theory be scrapped before then or extended. This is not mandatory, but disregarding the advice could affect the validity of your Swedish travel insurance.

The UK is one of several countries that still require Swedish travellers to self-isolate. This is mandatory for nearly everyone travelling from Sweden to the UK (read a list of exemptions here), and in England you can be fined £1,000 if you fail to do so or even up to £3,200 if you do not provide an accurate contact detail declaration.


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