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Switzerland and France conclude tax deal for cross-border ‘home workers’

Switzerland and France have concluded an agreement concerning cross-border employees working from their home in France during to the coronavirus pandemic.

Switzerland and France conclude tax deal for cross-border 'home workers'
shows a border between Switzerland and France closed by concrete block and adorned with Swiss flags in Presinge near Geneva. AFP
According to the State Secretariat for International Financial Matters (SFI), “the tax agreements between the two countries continue to apply as before, as long as the exceptional health measures are in force”.
 
This means that French cross-border workers will continue to be charged taxes as if they had physically gone to their workplace in Switzerland.
 
Under the taxation regime currently in place, permit G holders who work in cantons other than Geneva, have their taxes collected by French authorities.
 
However, if their place of employment is Geneva, taxes are paid in Switzerland.
 
 
In total, about 87,000 French citizens commute to work in Switzerland daily but there are no official figures on how many of them currently work from home.
 
 
The provisions of the agreement are valid until May 31st and will be renewed from month to month until Bern and Paris end health regulations that limit or discourage the movement of people.
 
However, either country may cancel the arrangement by mutual agreement at any time.
 
The SFI said that it is also in contact with authorities in Italy, Germany and Austria for the purpose of concluding similar tax agreements, clarifying tax obligations for cross-border  home workers from these countries.

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Coronavirus: Sweden extends travel ban from Denmark

Sweden on Sunday announced an extension to the travel ban from Denmark until February 14th, over concerns of the new variant of coronavirus spreading.

Coronavirus: Sweden extends travel ban from Denmark
Illustration photo of Copenhagen airport. Photo: Liselotte Sabroe / Ritzau Scanpix

The extension to the travel ban was confirmed at a digital press conference on Sunday January 24th, when the Swedish government announced a new travel ban on entry from Norway. The entry ban from the United Kingdom was also extended until February 14th.

On Saturday January 23rd, the Norwegian government introduced a series of very strict restrictions in Oslo and nine more municipalities due to an outbreak of the more contagious B117 coronavirus variant, first identified in Britain.

The British virus mutation already exists in Sweden. So far, about 50 cases have been confirmed, the vast majority of them are linked to people who have been abroad, according to the Swedish Public Health Agency.

“The ban applies from midnight until February 14th and can be extended if necessary”, Interior Minister Mikael Damberg said at the digital press conference on Sunday afternoon.

READ MORE: COVID UPDATE: Sweden bans travel entry from Norway

In December, the Swedish government announced a ban on travel into Sweden from both the UK and Denmark, due to the new coronavirus variant in the countries. The ban was initially due to last a month.

It was the first time during the pandemic that the Scandinavian country closed the border on one of its neighbours. 

Swedish citizens are exempt from the entry ban, as are non-citizens who live or work in Sweden, and people working in the transportation of goods.
 
The B117 coronavirus variant has previously been estimated to be between 50-74 percent more infectious than established forms of Covid-19.

It is expected to comprise 50 percent of all Covid-19 variants in circulation in Denmark by the middle of February, according to a new report issued by the State Serum Institute (SSI).

It has been traced to have first appeared in Denmark in November, but was reported to have become established in the south east of England in December.

READ ALSO: How could infectious Covid-19 variant impact Denmark's infection numbers?

 

 

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