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IMMIGRATION

Recycled fashion: Refugee boats find second life as bags in Berlin

The grey material from rubber dinghies, abandoned by migrants on the beaches of Greek islands, is finding a new life in Berlin.

Recycled fashion: Refugee boats find second life as bags in Berlin
Nora Azzaoui and Vera Günther, mimicry's founders. Photo: Judith Affolter

Leaning over his sewing machine in the workshop of the small Berlin-based company called mimycri, Khaldoun Alhussain concentrates as he stitches a piece of grey rubber.

A border of yellow thread takes shape on the material that he works with an expert hand.

SEE ALSO: My German career: How a Syrian soap shop owner in Berlin cleaned up his act

The material is transformed by refugees into different sorts of bags, sold on the internet.

Alhussain, a 34-year-old Syrian, is familiar with the robust and weather-resistant rubber that he now works with after being recovered in Greece.

The materials used to make bags. Photo: Judith Affolter

Four years ago, he climbed into a makeshift boat made of the very same material to reach the Aegean island of Chios from the Turkish coast.

“There were many of us and the crossing was very, very dangerous,” says the
tailor, who learnt his trade in garment factories in Damascus before he left
to seek asylum in Germany.

Rafts to bags

mimycri recovers inflatable rafts, abandoned on the shores of Chios and the nearby island of Lesbos, which both bore witness to the 2015 migration crisis when hundreds of thousands of refugees landed on Europe's beaches.

At the peak of the crisis, Greece recorded up to 7,000 arrivals a day.

While the number of crossings has slowed considerably since an agreement between the European Union and Turkey in 2016, it still averages around 100 people per day.

On the spot, non-profit organizations recover the boats that litter the coast, along with discarded life jackets and clothing.

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 

Nora looking very serious…tomorrow we let you into our world through our latest blog post ‘A Day in the Life of mimycri’ ?? Ever wondered how our team operates? What our office looks like? and even what we have for lunch? Wonder no more! ? Our core team is just four; co-founders Vera and Nora and Tailors Abi’s and Khaldoun. On top of that we have an incredible team of freelancers and volunteers that make every day in the studio different and exciting ? Keep a look out tomorrow to read more!! ⠀ .⠀ Photography @bopbopiambop & @meganjoybarclay .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ #mimycri #essenceofstories #upcycling #upcycledbag #whomademybag #handmade #ethicalfashion #fashionactivism #designforpurpose #withrefugees #socialstartup #madeinberlin #sustainableberlin #community #travel #blog #berlinblogger #sustainableblog #newblogpost #fridaysforfuture #design #summer #studiolife

Ein Beitrag geteilt von mimycri (@mimycri) am Jul 23, 2019 um 4:00 PDT

“We recover 90 percent of the boats stranded on the coast,” says Toula Kitromilidi, Greek coordinator of the NGO Chios Eastern Shore Response Team.

“The rest are used by the locals,” he adds, indicating how for example farmers convert the boats' rubber panels into tarpaulin covers.

Cut into large strips, the panels are sent to Berlin, cleaned and transformed into useful bags.

Customers “buy these bags because they tell a story, because they are more than just something you own,” says Vera Günther, one of mimycri's two founders, in her bright workshop.

Unique pieces with a story

Heavy sewing machines hum in the background under shelves filled with rolls of rubber.

Each segment is unique, sometimes with stripes or marks that often tell their own tragic stories.

The company's customers, who snapped up some 120,000 euros worth of its wares last year, can indirectly learn “what is happening in Syria… and how many people have died or are still dying there”, adds Alhussain.

His goal is to bring his mother to Berlin from Syria where she is sick and alone.

As for the inhabitants of the Greek islands, “they are very happy (with our work) because they do not want their beaches to be covered with plastic waste,” says Günther.

She gave up her job in the environmental sector to run mimycri.

In total, the company sells 11 products, with three percent of sales donated to NGOs in Greece.

Its latest creation is a toiletry bag, which, like all the products it sells on the internet, is also sold in some shops in Berlin and Munich.

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 

That same black material (from Tuesday's post), now re-imagined in a mimycri tote ✔️? Large, durable and striking – even without knowing its story you are sure to make an impression when you carry it wherever you go ?Shop mimycri bags on our website and read more about their rich stories and how we get them from the beach to the store. ⁠⠀ .⁠⠀ .⁠⠀ .⁠⠀ .⁠⠀ .⁠⠀ .⁠⠀ .⁠⠀ .⁠⠀ .⁠⠀ .⁠⠀ #mimycri #essenceofstories #upcycling #upcycledbag #whomademybag #handmade #ethicalfashion #fashionactivism #designforpurpose #withrefugees #socialstartup #madeinberlin #bag #community #travel #design #strength #fridaysforfuture #change #traveler #changeofperspective #sustainableliving #sustainableberlin

Ein Beitrag geteilt von mimycri (@mimycri) am Aug 8, 2019 um 4:26 PDT

Helping hand

Günther, 32, was among the Germans who came to offer their help to refugees as they arrived in droves at the country's train stations in the summer of 2015.

“I wanted to be part of this new Germany that welcomes people who have lost their belongings, their homes and sometimes also their families,” she said.

During winter 2015-16, she left for Chios to help frightened migrants landing on the beaches after often harrowing journeys.

With a German passport, she could make the crossing from the Turkish coastal city, Izmir, to the Greek island in 30 minutes for €14 “while drinking a beer and taking a little nap”.

She was profoundly aware that Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans were risking their lives on makeshift rafts by paying at least 1,000 dollars to human traffickers.

With her partner, Nora Azzaoui, she spent several months on the island and returned to Berlin with a section of rubber in her luggage.

It was transformed into a bag and the business idea was born.

The two young women managed to raise €43,000 in a crowdfunding scheme
to bring their dream to life.

Now, the small company employs five people, including a Syrian and a Pakistani.

“We want to change the way we look at refugees,” says Günther.

“These are people… who want to have a job, a house, just like all of us.”

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2022 SWEDISH ELECTION

OPINION: The far right now dominates the immigration debate in Sweden

A televised debate between the party leaders last weekend showed how Sweden’s third party, the far-right Sweden Democrats, has shaped Swedish politics since the last elections four years ago, argues David Crouch

OPINION: The far right now dominates the immigration debate in Sweden

In the build-up to the 2018 elections, the world’s media descended on Stockholm, expecting a breakthrough by the Sweden Democrats (SD) who had been polling as high as 25 percent. In the end, SD took third place with around 18 percent of the vote.

Four years later, SD are hovering at around the same level in the polls. However, Swedish politics has been utterly transformed, as the other main parties have moved onto political terrain previously occupied by SD.

This would have been unthinkable just a few short years ago. When they first entered parliament, SD were treated as political pariahs, a racist party, held at arm’s length by the other parties who refused to cooperate with them in any way.

Attempts to bring the SD into the mainstream of Swedish politics fell flat. The leader of the centre-right Moderates lost her job after suggesting it was “time to stop demonising” the SD. Her replacement, Ulf Kristersson, said he would neither negotiate nor govern with them. After the elections, two smaller centre-right parties – the Centre and the Liberals – agreed to prop up the coalition of Social Democrats and Greens to prevent the SD gaining any influence in parliament.

It was clear, however, that the only chance for the centre-right to govern would be with SD support. After all, in Finland and Norway right-wing populist parties had entered government with the centre right. And in Denmark, the centre-right had governed with populist support. If it worked there, why not in Sweden?

In early 2019, the SD leader Jimmie Åkesson famously had meatballs for lunch with Ebba Busch, the leader of the tiny Christian Democrats, who acted as a bridge-builder. A few months later, Kristersson met the SD leader for the first time in his Stockholm office. By early 2021 the cordon sanitaire dividing the parties had been truly dismantled, and in the autumn the three parties presented a joint budget.

Meanwhile, the Moderates stepped up their rhetoric against immigration and crime. But perhaps the influence has worked both ways? Maybe the far-right have toned down their policies, compromising with the centre so the parties can work together?

On the contrary, Åkesson and other leading SD figures have stoked up the fire and brimstone in their anti-immigrant message. For the SD, the problem is dark-skinned immigrants from Muslim countries whose values conflict with Sweden’s and who should therefore be deported.

The response among the Moderates – and also the governing Social Democrats – has been a deafening silence.

After the Easter riots in six Swedish cities, the Social Democrat government proposed a package of coercive measures to help the police and social services crackdown on criminals.

A televised debate between the party leaders last weekend brought this out very clearly. More than that, it showed how the Sweden Democrats have shaped Swedish politics since the country last voted four years ago.

In the debate on Sunday, prime minister Magdalena Andersson talked about being tough on crime and boasted that Sweden now has one of the strictest immigration regimes in Europe.

It was left to the Green Party (polling 4 percent) and the Centre Party (6 percent) to challenge the SD on immigration. They pointed out that the violent minority is tiny, and that tens of thousands of recent immigrants hold down jobs, obey the law and contribute to Swedish society.

Centre Party leader Annie Lööf listed some of the SD’s more extreme proposals, including demolition of high-immigration neighbourhoods, dawn raids on refugees, and collective punishment for crimes committed by a single family member. This was “pure racism”, Lööf said – where were the “red lines”, beyond which the centre-right would turn against the SD?

All the parties agree that segregation along ethnic lines has gone too far in Sweden, that integration efforts have failed and that something must be done. But there is a paucity of bold ideas that could really make a difference.

Immigration will once more be a battleground at the elections in September, with key politicians competing to be the toughest in dealing with unruly “foreigners”. Meanwhile, the underlying problems that have fuelled disaffection among people with immigrant backgrounds are unlikely to be addressed.

A few weeks ago, Swedish journalist Janne Josefsson spoke to Ahmed, one of the stone-throwing youngsters who shocked the country at Easter.

“We are second class citizens. You let us in, but then Sweden doesn’t care about us,” Ahmed told him. “We are trapped here. I have studied, but will never get a good job. At least once a week we are stopped by the police. In the end, you feel hunted, like a quarry. Do you understand?”

It seems that Swedish politicians don’t really want to.

David Crouch is the author of Almost Perfekt: How Sweden Works and What Can We Learn From It. He is a freelance journalist and a lecturer in journalism at Gothenburg University.

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Listen to a discussion on Sweden and immigration on Sweden in Focus, The Local’s podcast. 

Click HERE to listen to Sweden in Focus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or Google Podcasts.

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