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Heatwave: Temperatures of 34C expected in Germany

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Heatwave: Temperatures of 34C expected in Germany
Beach goers in Harlesiel in Lower Saxony on Friday after the sun came out. Photo: DPA
16:22 CEST+02:00
Sweater weather is coming to an end, as temperatures are expected to spike significantly in the coming days.

On Saturday the south of Germany will see a lot of sun, with temperatures reaching up to 33C, while the west and north will likely be struck by strong thunderstorms, reported the German Weather Service (DWD) on Friday.

These are expected to be accompanied by heavy rain, hail and gusts of wind, and over the course of the night will continue over the northeast towards Poland.

The following map from DWD shows where in Germany can expect to be hit by stormy weather on Saturday.

In the northwest, the Mercury will reach up to 27C, whereas in the other parts of Germany the maximum temperatures will be set at around 28 to 33C.

On Sunday, dense clouds can be expected to form in the north, whereas the south and east will be met with rain showers and individual thunderstorms. The afternoon is expected to stay dry.

While the temperatures in the northwest will barely exceed 23C, the Mercury is likely to rise over the 30C mark, when it can get up to 33C.

Monday Mercury high

On Monday temperatures are slated to heat up around the country, reaching up to 34C.

The upper Rhine region will likely be the warmest, reports DWD. The North Sea will see slight rain, but the rest of Germany will otherwise stay dry.

While the temperatures in July have been largely chilly for summer, in the high teens and early 20s, there has been little rain, especially in Germany’s most populous state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

The city of Essen, for example,  has only reached ten percent of its long-term monthly average this month so far.

"There should be one to two weeks of light to moderate downpours for the water to reach the bottom of the ground," Frank Balmert, a meteorologist with the German Weather Service (DWD) told RP Online.

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