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CRIME

Germany extradites ‘laser man’ racist killer to Sweden

Germany said Friday it had extradited to Sweden John Ausonius, the convicted killer known as "the laser man" for using a precision-scope rifle to target immigrants and a Holocaust survivor.

Germany extradites 'laser man' racist killer to Sweden
Ausonius on trial in Frankfurt in February 2018. Photo: DPA

“He was extradited on Thursday,” Frankfurt state prosecutor Nadja Niesen
told AFP.

Ausonius, a 65-year-old Swedish citizen, has been found guilty of murder in
both countries, most recently receiving a life term in Germany in February
last year that was upheld on appeal in November.

Previously he was already serving a life sentence in Sweden for a six-month
shooting spree in 1991-92.

Using the laser-scoped rifle, he had killed a 34-year-old Iranian man and
wounded 10 other people from countries including Brazil, Greece, Syria and
Zimbabwe.

In a sign of Ausonius's notoriety, Norwegian white supremacist mass
murderer Anders Behring Breivik at his own trial mentioned the “laser man” as
a figure who shared the same goals.

The convict, who was extradited to Germany in late 2016, was in February
2018 found guilty of the murder of 68-year-old Jewish Holocaust survivor
Blanka Zmigrod in Frankfurt in 1992.

Ausonius, having now received life terms in two countries, is considered
almost certain to spend the rest of his life locked up without parole.

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CRIME

Sweden launches major state initiative to fight cybercrime aimed at smart cars

Connected cars are increasingly exposed to security threats. Therefore, a major government initiative is now being launched via the research institute Rise.

Sweden launches major state initiative to fight cybercrime aimed at smart cars

More and more technical gadgets are now connected to the internet, and cars are no exception. However, the new reality raises questions about security, and from the Swedish side, an initiative is now being launched to combat cybercrime in the car industry through the government research institute Rise.

“We see a great need (for action), in regards to cyber-attacks in general and solving challenges related to the automotive industry’s drive to make cars more and more connected, and in the long run, perhaps even self-driving,” Rise chief Pia Sandvik stated.

Modern cars now have functions that allow car manufacturers to send out software updates exactly the same way as with mobile phones.

In addition to driving data, a connected car can also collect and pass on technical information about the vehicle.

Nightmare scenario

However, all this has raised questions about risks and the worst nightmare scenario in which someone could be able to take over and remotely operate a connected car.

Sandvik points out that, generally speaking, challenges are not only related to car safety but also to the fact that the vehicle can be a gateway for various actors to get additional information about car owners.

“If you want to gain access to information or cause damage, you can use different systems, and connected vehicles are one such system. Therefore, it is important to be able to test and see if you have robust and resilient systems in place,” she said.

Ethical hackers

Initially, about 15 employees at Rise will work on what is described as “Europe’s most advanced cyber security work” regarding the automotive industry.

Among the employees, there are also so-called “ethical hackers”, i.e., people who have been recruited specifically to test the systems.

“These are hackers who are really good at getting into systems, but not with the aim of inflicting damage, but to help and contribute to better solutions,” Sandvik noted.

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