Authentic European news, sourced locally
Country editions:
Jobs portals:
Social media:
Membership:
Mobile apps:
The Local logo

German word of the day: Stoßlüften

This content was produced independently by The Local and contains advertiser links.

Share this article

German word of the day: Stoßlüften
This content was produced independently by The Local and contains advertiser links.
08:58 CET+01:00
This word (and concept) is especially found in public places and schools all around Germany.

Let’s start with the translation. Literally, Stoß means “shock, impact or thrust” and lüften means “ventilating.” Stoßlüften therefore translates to “shock ventilation.”

Time's running out to join the Lingoda Language Marathon. Click here to learn German for free! Limited places, offer ends soon.

The concept behind that is rather simple: For about five minutes, you turn off the radiator, open all the windows and let the cold air stream in. Then you close the windows again and turn all the heating back on again. That allows a flush of cold air to stream into the room and make it fresh again. 

The outside temperature doesn’t matter – if it gets too cold you can always put on a coat after all. 

Here’s an example: If you have ever been to a German school, chances are that you might have noticed a note stuck to one of the classroom walls. That note probably stated some rules for a better room climate.

And following up after the point “Turn off the radiator when you leave the room,” it probably said something like “Mehrmals täglich stoßlüften.” (Shock-ventilate the room multiple times a day.)

Many teachers follow that rule, which usually leads to a wave of discontent from the students' side. The teacher will then tell them to stop complaining and to dress warmer.

Stoßlüften isn’t just good for the people in the room – it also prevents tor room to get mouldy. Especially in schools, when many (often sweaty) teenagers sit in one room for a long time, the levels of air humidity become quite large. Some good ol' Stoßlüften helps the air to circulate again. 

Living in Germany? Never learned German? Join the Lingoda Language Marathon and learn for free.

At a young age, children in Germany get used to the concept of stoßlüften. Photo: DPA

Examples:

Zieht euch eure Jacken an, wir machen eine Stoßlüftung!

Put on your coats, we’re doing a shock ventilation!

Ich hasse Stoßlüften.

I hate shock ventilation.

Learn German in three months, for free. Join the Lingoda Language Marathon today.

-

Do you have a favourite word you'd like to see us cover? If so, please email our editor Rachel Stern with your suggestion.

This article was produced independently with support from Lingoda.

Share this article