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EDUCATION

Where to find Swedish students abroad: top universities revealed

International students flock to Sweden every year, but plenty of Swedes also go abroad to study at schools and universities around the world – let's take a look at where Swedish students go.

Where to find Swedish students abroad: top universities revealed
Thousands of Swedes study abroad every year. Photo: Bertil Ericson/TT

Last year a total of 26,100 Swedes received funding from CSN (the Swedish government agency that approves student finance and loans) to study abroad – the smallest number in nine years.

The number of Swedes studying abroad has fluctuated between 24,500 and 29,700 since the turn of the millennium. It peaked in 2014/15 and has been on a steady downward curve since. This is likely a result of there simply being fewer people of school-leaving age, according to CSN.

Almost 7,000 were exchange students – people enrolled at a Swedish university who spend part of their degree abroad. But the majority – around 16,700 – were so-called free movers who applied for a course at a foreign university on their own initiative, instead of staying at home in Sweden.

READ ALSO: A third of young Swedes have studied abroad

The most popular destination among Swedish students is the United States, followed by the United Kingdom and Australia. On a city level, London hosts the largest number of Swedish students.

The top university was Riga Stradins University in Latvia followed by Poland's Medical University of Gdansk. They both attracted around 400 Swedish medical students each last year.

Next on the list were Copenhagen Business School and Santa Monica College and Santa Barbara City College in the US.

”When we do surveys, foreign students usually say that they make their choice based on where their preferred education is. Then there is also a number who wants to get out and do something else, and perhaps choose based on climate or something else,” CSN's Carl-Johan Stolt told TT.

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HEALTH

Swedish opposition proposes ‘rapid tests for ADHD’ to cut gang crime

The Moderate Party in Stockholm has called for children in so called "vulnerable areas" to be given rapid tests for ADHD to increase treatment and cut gang crime.

Swedish opposition proposes 'rapid tests for ADHD' to cut gang crime

In a press release, the party proposed that treating more children in troubled city areas would help prevent gang crime, given that “people with ADHD diagnoses are “significantly over-represented in the country’s jails”. 

The idea is that children in so-called “vulnerable areas”, which in Sweden normally have a high majority of first and second-generation generation immigrants, will be given “simpler, voluntary tests”, which would screen for ADHD, with those suspected of having the neuropsychiatric disorder then put forward for proper evaluations to be given by a child psychiatrist. 

“The quicker you can put in place measures, the better the outcomes,” says Irene Svenonius, the party’s leader in the municipality, of ADHD treatment, claiming that children in Sweden with an immigrant background were less likely to be medicated for ADHD than other children in Sweden. 

In the press release, the party said that there were “significant differences in the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD within Stockholm country”, with Swedish-born children receiving diagnosis and treatment to a higher extent, and with ADHD “with the greatest probability” underdiagnosed in vulnerable areas. 

At a press conference, the party’s justice spokesman Johan Forsell, said that identifying children with ADHD in this areas would help fight gang crime. 

“We need to find these children, and that is going to help prevent crime,” he said. 

Sweden’s climate minister Annika Strandhäll accused the Moderates of wanting to “medicate away criminality”. 

Lotta Häyrynen, editor of the trade union-backed comment site Nya Mitten, pointed out that the Moderates’s claim to want to help children with neuropsychiatric diagnoses in vulnerable areas would be more credible if they had not closed down seven child and youth psychiatry units. 

The Moderate Party MP and debater Hanif Bali complained about the opposition from left-wing commentators and politicians.

“My spontaneous guess would have been that the Left would have thought it was enormously unjust that three times so many immigrant children are not getting a diagnosis or treatment compared to pure-Swedish children,” he said. “Their hate for the Right is stronger than their care for the children. 

Swedish vocab: brottsförebyggande – preventative of crime 

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