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ENVIRONMENT

Wolf explosion in Liguria leads to calls for cull

The northeastern Italian region of Liguria is considering hunting its wolves due to a lack of funds available to reimburse farmers for the damage the animals wreak on livestock.

Wolf explosion in Liguria leads to calls for cull
The Italian region of Liguria is considering hunting its rampant wolf population. Photo: Wikimedia

In 2014, conservationists put the Ligurian wolf population at 50, but regional councillors say there are now many more – and they are killing and mauling many farmers' animals.

“In the last year the population has exploded. We think there are now as many as 200 wolves in the region,” Stefano Mai from the Northern League party told La Repubblica.

“Starting to hunt them again is a solution we are looking at.”

According to Mai, the region doesn't have enough money to keep compensating farmers for all the sheep, goats and calves the wolves are taking. 

“Instances are multiplying too quickly,” he added.

But proposals to start hunting the wolves again have proved controversial.

“They are not harmful to man and their diet is made up mostly of wild animals, inducing wild boars,” said Marco De Ferrari, the spokesperson for the Five Star Movement in Liguria, highlighting the role they could play in keeping Italy's rampant boar population in check. 

The Grey Wolf (Canis Lupus) has been protected by the EU since 1992, having been hunted to near extinction.

Though protected animals, EU members can carry out a cull of wolves provided the measure is justified on very specific grounds and meets conservation criteria – as controversially happened in Sweden earlier this year.

There are now thought to be upwards of 1,200 wolves  across Italy, mostly living in the mountains of the Alps and Apennines.

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ENVIRONMENT

Sweden to set world’s first consumption-based emissions target

Sweden political parties have unanimously backed the world's first consumption-based emissions target, with the country aiming to hit net zero by 2045.

Sweden to set world's first consumption-based emissions target

The committee responsible for setting Sweden’s environmental goals on Thursday presented its proposals for what goals Sweden should set for greenhouse has emissions linked to the country’s consumption. 

“No other country in the world has done what we have done,” Emma Nohrén, chair of the climate goals committee, said at a press conference announcing the goals. “There has been a pioneering sprit.” 

About 60 percent of the emissions caused by people living in Sweden are released in other countries producing goods to be consumed in Sweden, meaning Sweden’s production-based emissions goals, like those of other countries, arguably misrepresent Sweden’s impact.  

In a press statement, the government said that as well as the 2045 consumption emissions target, the committee has suggested setting targets for the climate impact of its exports, include emissions from flights and cargo ships in its long-term national climate goals, and aim to include emissions from internal flights in its target for domestic transport by 2030.  

The committee also proposes that emissions from goods and services ordered by the public sector should decline at a faster rate than those of the rest of the country. 

Amanda Palmstierna, an MP for the Green Party who sits on the committee, said it was positive that the new goals had the backing of all seven of Sweden’s parliamentary parties. 

“It’s important that all the parties are backing this proposal so that it can become implemented,” she said. “Significant action is required now. We have so little time, as we saw in the IPCC report which came out on Monday.”  

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