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EDUCATION

Two Spanish teenagers face jail time over cheating in exam

Two young men in Almeria could face one year in prison after one was caught pretending to be the other to take an entrance exam.

Two Spanish teenagers face jail time over cheating in exam
Stock photo of taking an exam. Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

The students in Almeria in southern Spain were caught attempting to cheat an entrance exam for vocational studies when one showed up to take the test pretending to be the other, Europa Press reported on Friday.

Public prosecutors have accused the boys of committing a crime of falsifying public documents because the one that went to the exam had to use the other’s ID card and took the test under the other boy’s name.

The prosecution is seeking a sentence of one year in prison for each as well as a fine of €6 to be paid each day for 12 months.

One of the students’ defense attorney argued that the proposed sentence is “barbaric” and out of proportion with the act, saying that the exam should not be considered as an official document.

“They have not harmed anyone and even though this conduct was reproachable, it does not create social alarm enough to have them sent to prison,” attorney José Carlos Segura said.

“That this case is going to trial is already disproportionate and I believe it could be solved with an administrative fine or sanction of academic consequences,” he continued. “This kind of punishment threatens them with a loss of liberty and records them permanently as criminals.”

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EDUCATION

Swedish chain banned from opening new schools for ‘serious failings’

One of Sweden's leading free school chains has been banned from opening new schools or otherwise expanding after the schools inspectorate identified "serious failings'.

Swedish chain banned from opening new schools for 'serious failings'

Thorengruppen educates 15,000 pupils in Sweden through its chain of primary schools, upper secondary schools, SFI language schools and professional training schools. It currently has applications outstanding to open 28 new schools or other educational establishments in the country. 

“We have judged that the shortcomings in the applicant’s existing establishments are so serious that in the current situation the conditions are not in place for them to run additional ones,” said Carin Clevesjö, the head of the inspectorate’s school permits division.  

According to Sweden’s state broadcaster SVT, the inspectorate discovered in the spring that pupils at the group’s Thoren framtid primary school in Älmhult had not received any tuition at all in Geography for two years, with schools in Sundsvall and Solna showing similar severe failings. The group has been ordered to pay a total of half a million kronor in fines. 

In its decision, the inspectorate said that this demonstrated that the company did not have the “wherewithal to follow the relevant requirements”. 

In an email to SVT, the group’s head of new schools, Christina Runesdotter, said it was wrong to judge the quality of the group as a whole from a few individual cases. 

“We consider that one cannot judge the quality of a huvudman [an entity responsible for a school] from individual cases,” she wrote. 

According to SVT, the inspectorate has rejected applications from the company in Munkedal, Ale, Östersund, Växjö, Södertälje, Nyköping, Karlstad, Halmstad, Falu, Eskilstuna, Helsingborg, Borås, Norrköping, Solna, Skellefteå, Uppsala, Gävle, Umeå Jönköping, Kristianstad, Sundsvall, Malmö, Västerås, and Lund. 

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