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CRIME

Two women held over slaying of 60-year-old

Norwegian police have detained two women in connection with the death of a 60-year-old man in Kvinnherad.

Two women held over slaying of 60-year-old
Police at the scene in Kvinnherad. Photo: Kai-Inge Melkeraaen/Haugesunds Avis/Scanpix

Norwegian police have detained two women in connection with the death of a 60-year-old man, stating late on Wednesday that they suspected a potential crime.

On Thursday morning, police in Bergen confirmed that they had detained a woman in her thirties and a woman in her forties. They are currently being interrogated for their suspected role in manslaughter.

Police spokesman Carl-Petter Leganger siad they had not yet establisehd what realtionship if any the two suspects had to the victim.  Forensic officers, meanwhile, are set to secure evidence at the scene.

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IMMIGRATION

Norway’s UDI uncovers use of fake diplomas in hundreds of work permit applications

Several hundred fake education certificates and diplomas were used in fraudulent Norwegian work permit applications, the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) has revealed.

Norway’s UDI uncovers use of fake diplomas in hundreds of work permit applications

For the majority who hail from outside the EEA, the main way to be able to live and work in Norway legally is by holding a residence permit.

The most common of these for workers without a Norwegian partner is the work permit. These are awarded to individuals who have been offered a job by an employer which requires specific qualifications to be carried out, such as a university degree or vocational education diploma.

Norway’s immigration authority, the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UD), last year uncovered hundreds of work permit applications that were submitted with fraudulent documentation, the Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten reports.

These came in the form of counterfeit education certificates used to demonstrate the applicant is qualified for the job offered.

The immigration authority first detected the use of fake paperwork when it received an abnormally large number of applications from Turkish nationals claiming to be trained chefs. Upon further investigation, it was revealed that the applicants had issued bogus certificates and weren’t formally trained as cooks.

Following this discovery, the UDI performed a random check of 20 applications, 11 of which turned out to be fraudulent. This prompted increased scrutiny of similar application types.

Aftenposten also reports that the UDI discovered applications from Indian nationals with fake certificates saying they were trained as mechanics. The UDI also uncovered applications from Kosovo and Iran filed with forged documentation.

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