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FRANKFURT

This week’s highlights: March 14 – 20

This Week's Highlights: Books in Leipzig, St. Patrick's Day in Munich, and a William S. Burroughs retrospective begins in Hamburg.

This week's highlights: March 14 – 20
Photo: DPA

BERLIN

Film

Radical Frame Film Festival – Short Film Series 2013

Roco wants to stay in jail. Frank wants to deliver a letter. And Sophie just wants to make the right decision. The stars of the twelve short films in the Radical Frame Film Festival’s new series are an intriguing bunch. Get better acquainted with their plights when the international movies screen in their original versions, with English subtitles this week in Berlin.

Price: €5

Location: Lichtblick Kino, Kastanienallee 77

Times: Tuesday, March 19, 8pm and Wednesday, March 20, 8pm

Phone: 030 44 05 81 79

More Information: radicalshort.webnode.com

Theatre

FIND 2013 – Festival of International New Drama

The Schaubühne stage blossoms with new theatre from around Europe this week as directors from Italy, Spain, Greece, Russia, Hungary and Iceland roll into town. Go see Frankenstein Project, Kornel Mundruczo’s contemporary take on Mary Shelley’s classic, or watch two men cook their way to a woman’s heart in Rodrigo Garcia’s Notes From the Kitchen. All plays feature English surtitles.

Price: €7 – 43

Location: Schaubühne am Lehniner Platz, Kurfürstendamm 153

Times: Saturday, March 16 – Sunday, March 24

Ticket Hotline: 030 890 023

More Information: www.schaubuehne.de

COLOGNE

Film

Keiichi Hara – Colorful

A depressed soul gets a second chance at life in acclaimed Japanese anime director Keiichi Hara’s 2010 film Colorful. Based on the novel by Eto Mori, the film screens Saturday with English subtitles at the Japan Foundation followed by a discussion with the filmmaker. The talk is in Japanese (with German interpretation), but even if you don’t understand a lick of the language, go shake the hand of an anime hero.

Price: Free

Location: Japanisches Kulturinstitut, Universitatsstrasse 98

Times: Saturday, March 16, 4pm

More Information: www.jki.de

Children’s Events

Easter Crafts Workshop

Two weeks until Easter means it’s time for the kids to break out the craft supplies. The children’s language organization Mehrsprache invites young crafters of all ages to grab some scissors and glue and make some baskets and cute little baby chicks for the spring holiday. Join the fun Sunday afternoon and then go home and dye some eggs.

Price: Free (Registration requested)

Location: Mehrsprache, Neuenhöfer Allee 125

Times: Sunday, March 17, 3pm

More Information: www.mehrsprache.de

Music/Concerts

“M” aka Matthieu Chedid

“M”, pronounced “aime” as in the French word for love, is the nom de plume of Paris rocker Matthieu Chedid. You might have heard him sing with his pop Louis Chedid as a chap, or in a duet with his lady Vanessa Paradis. In the midst of a tour around Germany in support of his latest disc IL, the eccentric entertainer stops off Monday night in Cologne.

Price: €23

Location: Gloria Theater,
 Apostelnstrasse 11

Times: Monday, March 18, 8pm

Ticket Hotline: 0221 2801

More Information: www.gloria-theater.com

HAMBURG

Galleries/Museums

The Name is Burroughs: Expanded Media – William S. Burroughs Retrospective

Did you know the Naked Lunch penman was also a visual artist? Burroughs cornered the market in experimental fiction back in the 1950s. Turns out, while the author was taking a break from his typewriter, he was busy making paintings, collages, films, photos, and audio recordings. Be among the wanderers at the exhibition opening Friday and see if the artwork is as controversial as his writing.

Price: €15 (Regular Admission)

Location: Sammlung Falckenberg, Wilstorfer Strasse 71, Tor 2

Times: Friday, March 15, 7pm (Opening); March 16 – August 18 (By appointment only)

Tour Reservations: 040 3250 6762

More Information: www.sammlung-falckenberg.de

LEIPZIG

Events

The Leipzig Book Fair

Bibliophiles from around the world will be gathering in Leipzig this weekend when books of all types pile high in the halls of the Congress Center. Go and browse the stalls, catch a reading, and meet some authors. There’s nothing like that new book smell.

Price: €13.50

Location: Leipziger Messe, Messe-Allee 1

Times: 10am-6pm, Thursday, March 14 – Sunday, March 17

Visitor Helpline: 0341 678 89 97

More Information: www.leipziger-buchmesse.com

MUNICH

Events

St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Step in time to pipers and fiddlers Sunday in Munich. It’s St. Patrick’s Day! Munich’s Irish population celebrates each year with a grand parade and party. Line up along Leopoldstrasse or Ludwigsstrasse and wave to the festive marching groups like the Emerald Dancers, the Waltzing Mathildas, and the Jolly Jigs.

Price: Free

Location: From Münchner Freiheit to Odeonsplatz

Times: Sunday, March 17, Noon-12:45 (Parade); 12:45-5pm (After Party)

More Information: www.stpatricksday.de

Music/Concerts

French Week at the Bayerischen Hof

While Munich’s Irish are sporting their green this week, the city’s Francophiles are drinking wine and eating cheese over at the Bayerischen Hof. Join them Monday night when singer Sophie Wegener and pianist Andrea Hermanau kick off seven days of French music with songs from that neighboring land.

Price: Various

Location: Hotel Bayerischer Hof, Promenadeplatz 2-6

Times: Monday, March 18 – Sunday, March 24

Phone: 089 2120 994

More Information: www.bayerischerhof.de

Dance/Theatre

Think Big! Dance and Performance for Young Audiences

In an effort to get young performers “thinking big” about dance and theatre, acclaimed companies from the Netherlands, Belgium, France, and Germany are strutting their stuff in Munich this week. Be dazzled by new choreography from around the continent, and sign up for a workshop or two.

Price: Various

Location: Various

Times: Monday, March 18 – Friday, March 22

More Information: www.thinkbigfestival.de

NUREMBERG

Film

Turkey/Germany Film Festival

From romance in a border town in 1990s Yugoslavia to disillusioned dames in a German mountain town during World War II, the topics explored in this festival of German/Turkish films are fascinating. Head to Nuremberg this week where filmmakers from Germany and Turkey are showcasing new cinema at one of Europe’s most exciting film festivals.

Price: TBD

Location: Various

Times: Thursday, March 14 – Sunday, March 24

More Information: www.fftd.net

INTEGRATION

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

“Berlin enabled me to become the kind of person I want to be,” Canadian Mo Moubarak tells us.

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?
Photo: Getty Images

 Produced by The Local’s Creative Studio in partnership with Berlin Partner for Business and Technology

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

“Berlin enabled me to become the kind of person I want to be,” says Canadian Mo Moubarak. It’s a sentiment that resonates with many international people who moved to the German capital to work in a vibrant atmosphere of innovation and progress.

From its thriving startup scene to its enviable cultural highlights, Berlin is one of the world’s most exciting cities – and, with the rare sense of freedom and opportunity it offers, the city continues to attract global talent during the pandemic.

Moubarak, one of the founders of the successful digital recruitment firm MoBerries, is effusive about the city he has made his home: “I came here as a 19-year-old with €3,000 in my pocket, and went on to run my own company. You know what makes this city incredible? Your word means everything – that’s what matters. Not your money.”

While living in Berlin is an unforgettable experience, that doesn’t mean it comes without its challenges for internationals, however. That’s why The Local has partnered with Berlin Partner for Business and Technology, the city’s public-private development partnership, to explore the experiences of three international people living and working in the German capital. 

From the level of English to digitalisation, we’re also inviting you to make your voice heard on how Berlin could become even more welcoming to new arrivals. 

Want to make Berlin an even better place for internationals? Take the 5-minute Talent Berlin Survey (one reader who completes it will win two years of free access to The Local Germany)

Photos: Getty Images

Hurdles and challenges

Problems securing accommodation, lack of clarity in regards to visas and long waiting times for appointments were some of the concerns voiced by Claire Waggoner, an American copywriter who moved to Berlin in 2019.

Although she loves life in the capital for its vibrancy and cultural heritage, she states: “Making the choice to move here was pretty much the only ‘easy’ thing about moving from the US to Germany. There were two major challenges: securing an apartment and getting the ‘letters of intent’ required for my freelancer’s visa.

“If I could have spoken with a government employee before my visa appointment, I would have been much more confident going into that initial appointment.”

Priyanka Nair, originally from India, came to Berlin in 2016 to study an MBA, before moving into HR. She says she faced similar challenges. 

“I could manage with the bureaucracy as I spoke German but wondered how those who couldn’t speak the language would manage,” she says. “Getting appointments with different agencies was difficult. I sat up late looking for appointments at government offices like the foreign or registration offices.

“Like for everyone, finding accommodation was the hardest part.”

Having said that, Priyanka is hugely enthusiastic about the city she now calls home and the opportunities to integrate by getting involved with group activities.

“Do you like Improv? There are meetups weekly. Want to stand up for a cause? There are various demonstrations you can participate in. Love sport? You can join any sports club or do a marathon. The point is, there is something for everyone here. You can be whoever you want.”

Create the Berlin you want to live and work in: take the Talent Berlin Survey (for every completed survey, Berlin Partner will plant a tree)

Share your views and experiences

The examples above are some of the hurdles that Berlin Partner – a partnership between the city government and local business – wants to learn more about. To reach out to the many internationals who have made the city their own, Berlin Partner has created the new Talent Berlin Survey.

The short, confidential survey gives you the chance to share your view of life in Berlin, so you can help shape and improve all the important aspects of the relocation and settling in process. It’s a unique opportunity to tell the state government how you think Berlin can become a more welcoming city for international newcomers like yourself.

“Berlin is the most international city in Germany, and it’s changing all the time,” says Burkhard Volbracht, Head of Unit Talent International at Berlin Partner. “From my experience, we’ve seen a lot of people come to Berlin in recent years – and the government thinks that they’re all settling in smoothly.

“We feel that this is the wrong picture. Some people do struggle and have problems, and they do need the right person to speak with, or the right door to open. What we at Berlin Partner want to identify are concrete points where we can be better – for example, language competencies or better digital services. We want to be able to roll out the red carpet, in a sense.

“We think that this is the first opportunity for those coming to Berlin to really tell us how they found moving to the city”.

Mo Moubarak
Claire Waggoner
Priyanka Nair

Shape Berlin’s future (in just five minutes!)

Have you moved to Berlin to work, or are you in the process of moving? Here’s your chance to help build the kind of city that suits both your career and lifestyle needs.

Spending five minutes to complete the survey will not only help build a friendlier, more inclusive German centre of innovation, but for every survey completed, Berlin Partner will plant a tree, contributing to sustainability efforts in the Berlin area.

The Local is also offering a two-year membership for one reader that completes the survey – that’s two years of insider insights, advice and explainers for life in Germany.

Want to help shape Berlin’s future in just 5 minutes? Take the Talent Berlin Survey. One lucky reader who completes the survey will receive two years of free access to The Local Germany

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