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FRANKFURT

What’s on in Germany: January 24 – 30

This Week's Highlights: English theatre in Wiesbaden, German punk-rap in Dresden, and African literature in Frankfurt

What's on in Germany: January 24 – 30
Photo: DPA

BERLIN

Comedy

Laughing Cows Presents Maureen Younger and Friends

Acclaimed British comedienne Maureen Younger returns to Berlin’s Kookaburra Comedy Club Tuesday night with her plucky pals Shazia Mirza and Jo Caulfield. Satiate your hunger for English humour and belt out a few belly laughs.

Price: €10

Location: Club Kookaburra, Schönhauser Allee 184

Times: Tuesday, January 29, 8:30

Reservations: 030 48 62 31 86

More Information: www.comedyclub.de

Galleries/Museums

Secret Universe IV – George Widener

Some people can’t get enough of statistical details. American artist George Widener is one of them. He merges his love for numbers, (population statistics, mathematical calculations, historical data, etc.) with art by creating interesting and informative imagery where numbers combine with graphics. The fourth installment in the Hamburger Bahnhof’s “Secret Universe” series, which focuses on artists who haven’t gotten much attention in the art world, features Widener’s complex number pictures.

Price: €10

Location: Hamburger Bahnhof, Invalidenstrasse 50-51

Times: Tuesday – Friday, 10am-6pm; Thursday, 10am-8pm; Saturday and Sunday, 11am-6pm; Friday, January 25 – Sunday, June 16

Phone: 030 266 42 42 42

More Information: www.hamburgerbahnhof.de

Events

International Green Week

Food, agriculture, and horticulture from around the world take center stage at Berlin’s expo center this week. Take a stroll through the “Hall of Flowers,” taste delicacies from Egypt, Azerbaijan, Finland, and France, and bring the kids to see the animal shows in the livestock arena. This year’s partner country is the Netherlands. Make a point to learn something new about our northwestern neighbour.

Price: €13 (One-Day Ticket); €26 (Family Pass)

Location: Messe Berlin, Messedamm 22

Times: Thursday, January 24, 10am-6pm; Friday, January 25 and Saturday, January 26, 10am-8pm; Monday, January 27, 10am-6pm

Phone: 030 3038 2027

More Information: www.gruenewoche.de

COLOGNE

Galleries/Museums

Theme Day: Africa

Celebrate all things African this weekend in Cologne. The Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum’s African Theme Day features live music, lectures, workshops, food, and special tours all based around that great continent known as “The Motherland.” Take a gospel-singing workshop, see photographer Dirk Schäfer’s shots from a motorcycle trip he took from Namibia to Kenya, and hear South African literary star Mike Nicol read from his new thriller. It all happens Sunday.

Price: €7

Location: Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum, Cäcilienstrasse 29-33

Times: Sunday, January 27, 10am – 8pm

Phone: 0221 221 313 56

More Information: www.museenkoeln.de

DRESDEN

Music/Concerts

The Incredible Herrengedeck

For an authentic night of German punk-cabaret-rap, sidle up to the stage at Ostpol in Dresden on Tuesday. The Incredible Herrengedeck play piano, guitar, and bass, and sing about such topics as Prenzlauerberg in the nineties with just the right amount of straight-faced sarcasm. Some comprehension of the German language is required to really get the act, but even if you don’t understand a lick of what they’re saying, you’re still guaranteed to have a fun time.

Price: €6.60

Location: Ostpol, Konigsbruckerstrasse 47

Times: Tuesday, January 29, 10pm

More Information: www.zeitzubleiben.tickets.de

FRANKFURT

Literature

Africanissimo – African Literature Days

“Strong voices and new stories” from Ethiopia to Zimbabwe will be showcased at a two-day festival of African literature at the Frankfurt Literature House. Get acquainted with contemporary authors from across Africa with the festival’s rich program of readings and discussions, many of which will include English translation. And don’t miss the closing performance of music and poetry Saturday night.

Price: €6 (Single Events); €25 (Festival Pass)

Location: Literaturhaus Frankfurt, Schöne Aussicht 2

Times: Friday, January 25, 4pm and Saturday, January 26, 11am

Phone: 069 2102 113

More Information: www.litprom.de

HAMBURG

Galleries/Museums

Giacometti – The Playing Fields

Swiss surrealist sculptor Alberto Giacometti liked to depict the human figure as fantastically tall and thin as he could manage – larger than life wisps of human beings. A new exhibition at the Hamburger Kunsthalle presents 120 of the legendary artist’s works, including post-war paintings, sketches, and photographs, as well as models he made for public spaces in New York in the 1960s.

Price: €12

Location: Hamburger Kunsthalle, Glockengiesserwall

Times: Thursday, January 24, 7pm (Opening); Tuesday – Sunday, 10am-6pm; Thursday, 10am-9pm; January 25 – May 19 (Regular Hours)

Phone: 040 428 131 200

More Information: www.hamburger-kunsthalle.de

Good Prospects – Young German Photography 2012/2013

If your name is included in the list of “Good Prospects – Young German Photography” prize winners, you’re already well on your way to making a name for yourself. Meet this year’s batch of seven chosen ones when the exhibition of their work opens at Hamburg’s House of Photography Friday night. Stefan Kiefer and Matthias Schönebäumer preside over the turntables while photo fans mingle.

Price: €9

Location: House of Photography, Deichtorstrasse 1-2


Times: Friday, January 25, 7pm (Opening); Tuesday – Sunday, 11am-6pm; January 25 – March 3 (Regular Hours)

Tickets: 040 321 030

More Information: www.deichtorhallen.de

MUNICH

Galleries/Museums

Tasty Things – Fashion From the 1970s

With psychedelic prints and candy coloured hues of grape, tangerine, and acid green, the 1970s were a special time for fashion. A new exhibition at the Munich City Museum showcases the polyester caftans, bell bottoms, and platform shoes that made the decade so groovalicious. Gawk at fashion posters, design sketches, photographs, and original pieces by Pucci, Pino Lancetti, Halston, and other stars of the 1970s fashion scene.

Price: €4

Location: Münchner Stadtmuseum, St-Jakobs-Platz 1


Times: Tuesday – Sunday, 10am-6pm; January 25 – September 15

Tickets: 089 233 22370

More Information: www.muenchner-stadtmuseum.de

Theatre

Excavations – The Anatomy Lesson

What’s inside a newborn baby? Have a look Friday night in Munich, when artist Marijs Boulogne weaves an endoscope through her little one. Freaked out? Don’t worry, the Belgian performer’s baby is made of yarn, cotton, and silk threads. In a piece reminiscent of a David Lynch scene, Boulogne performs an autopsy on the stillborn child, revealing the exquisite anatomy of its innards. Go see the strange and wonderful performance and contemplate life, death, and the fragility of humanity.

Price: €12

Location: Münchner Stadtmuseum, St-Jakobs-Platz 1


Times: Friday, January 25, 7:30pm

Tickets: 089 233 24482

More Information: www.figurentheater-gfp.de

WIESBADEN

Theatre

Wiesbaden English Language Theatre – Almost Maine

In the heart of winter, way up in northern Maine, there’s not much else to do but fall in love. Called “a wooly midwinter night’s dream” by the Dallas Observer, Almost Maine is a touching romantic comedy by American playwright John Cariani. Wiesbaden English Language Theatre’s production runs all week long. Go and warm up with a little English language laughter.

Price: €15

Location: Gemeinschaftszentrum Georg-Buch-Haus, Wellritzstrasse 38

Times: Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, January 24 – February 2, 7:30pm

More Information: www.wiesbaden-english-language-theater.de

INTEGRATION

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

“Berlin enabled me to become the kind of person I want to be,” Canadian Mo Moubarak tells us.

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?
Photo: Getty Images

 Produced by The Local’s Creative Studio in partnership with Berlin Partner for Business and Technology

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

“Berlin enabled me to become the kind of person I want to be,” says Canadian Mo Moubarak. It’s a sentiment that resonates with many international people who moved to the German capital to work in a vibrant atmosphere of innovation and progress.

From its thriving startup scene to its enviable cultural highlights, Berlin is one of the world’s most exciting cities – and, with the rare sense of freedom and opportunity it offers, the city continues to attract global talent during the pandemic.

Moubarak, one of the founders of the successful digital recruitment firm MoBerries, is effusive about the city he has made his home: “I came here as a 19-year-old with €3,000 in my pocket, and went on to run my own company. You know what makes this city incredible? Your word means everything – that’s what matters. Not your money.”

While living in Berlin is an unforgettable experience, that doesn’t mean it comes without its challenges for internationals, however. That’s why The Local has partnered with Berlin Partner for Business and Technology, the city’s public-private development partnership, to explore the experiences of three international people living and working in the German capital. 

From the level of English to digitalisation, we’re also inviting you to make your voice heard on how Berlin could become even more welcoming to new arrivals. 

Want to make Berlin an even better place for internationals? Take the 5-minute Talent Berlin Survey (one reader who completes it will win two years of free access to The Local Germany)

Photos: Getty Images

Hurdles and challenges

Problems securing accommodation, lack of clarity in regards to visas and long waiting times for appointments were some of the concerns voiced by Claire Waggoner, an American copywriter who moved to Berlin in 2019.

Although she loves life in the capital for its vibrancy and cultural heritage, she states: “Making the choice to move here was pretty much the only ‘easy’ thing about moving from the US to Germany. There were two major challenges: securing an apartment and getting the ‘letters of intent’ required for my freelancer’s visa.

“If I could have spoken with a government employee before my visa appointment, I would have been much more confident going into that initial appointment.”

Priyanka Nair, originally from India, came to Berlin in 2016 to study an MBA, before moving into HR. She says she faced similar challenges. 

“I could manage with the bureaucracy as I spoke German but wondered how those who couldn’t speak the language would manage,” she says. “Getting appointments with different agencies was difficult. I sat up late looking for appointments at government offices like the foreign or registration offices.

“Like for everyone, finding accommodation was the hardest part.”

Having said that, Priyanka is hugely enthusiastic about the city she now calls home and the opportunities to integrate by getting involved with group activities.

“Do you like Improv? There are meetups weekly. Want to stand up for a cause? There are various demonstrations you can participate in. Love sport? You can join any sports club or do a marathon. The point is, there is something for everyone here. You can be whoever you want.”

Create the Berlin you want to live and work in: take the Talent Berlin Survey (for every completed survey, Berlin Partner will plant a tree)

Share your views and experiences

The examples above are some of the hurdles that Berlin Partner – a partnership between the city government and local business – wants to learn more about. To reach out to the many internationals who have made the city their own, Berlin Partner has created the new Talent Berlin Survey.

The short, confidential survey gives you the chance to share your view of life in Berlin, so you can help shape and improve all the important aspects of the relocation and settling in process. It’s a unique opportunity to tell the state government how you think Berlin can become a more welcoming city for international newcomers like yourself.

“Berlin is the most international city in Germany, and it’s changing all the time,” says Burkhard Volbracht, Head of Unit Talent International at Berlin Partner. “From my experience, we’ve seen a lot of people come to Berlin in recent years – and the government thinks that they’re all settling in smoothly.

“We feel that this is the wrong picture. Some people do struggle and have problems, and they do need the right person to speak with, or the right door to open. What we at Berlin Partner want to identify are concrete points where we can be better – for example, language competencies or better digital services. We want to be able to roll out the red carpet, in a sense.

“We think that this is the first opportunity for those coming to Berlin to really tell us how they found moving to the city”.

Mo Moubarak
Claire Waggoner
Priyanka Nair

Shape Berlin’s future (in just five minutes!)

Have you moved to Berlin to work, or are you in the process of moving? Here’s your chance to help build the kind of city that suits both your career and lifestyle needs.

Spending five minutes to complete the survey will not only help build a friendlier, more inclusive German centre of innovation, but for every survey completed, Berlin Partner will plant a tree, contributing to sustainability efforts in the Berlin area.

The Local is also offering a two-year membership for one reader that completes the survey – that’s two years of insider insights, advice and explainers for life in Germany.

Want to help shape Berlin’s future in just 5 minutes? Take the Talent Berlin Survey. One lucky reader who completes the survey will receive two years of free access to The Local Germany

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