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MUNICH

What’s on in Germany: January 10 – 16

This Week's Highlights: Bach in Berlin, comedy in Frankfurt, and an exhibition about the German jazz label ECM in Munich.

What's on in Germany:  January 10 – 16
Photo: Sheet music in Bach's handwriting, Wikipedia Commons

BERLIN

Music/Concerts

From Bach to Bach

From the Jacksons to the Wainwrights we’ve all got our favorite musical families. But the Bachs eclipse them all. Enjoy motets and organ works by Johann Sebastian Bach and his illustrious brood Saturday in Berlin. The city’s Baroque cathedral provides the perfect setting for a performance full of counterpoint and technical prowess by cathedral organist Andreas Sieling and the Leipzig Chamber Choir.

Price: €14

Location: Berliner Dom, Am Lustgarten

Times: Saturday, January 12, 8pm

Tickets: 030 202 69 136

More Information: www.berlinerdom.de

Gypsy Opera

Riotous glamour and old school elegance converge at Clärchen’s Balhaus Sunday night when Gypsy Opera takes the stage. A mezzo-soprano and a baritone belt out arias from the classical opera repertoire while the four piece band weaves in 1930s rhythms. Dance along to the splendour. It doesn’t get any more dramatic than this.

Price: €22

Location: Clärchens Ballhaus, Auguststrasse 25

Times: Sunday, January 13, 6:30pm

Ticket Hotline: 030 282 92 95

More Information: www.operanos.de

COLOGNE

Music/Concerts

Che Sudaka

The six energetic dudes in this Barcelona-based band have been going strong for ten years now. Hailing from Argentina and Columbia, the guys bring an irresistible mix of Latin-ska and “punky reggae” to the stage. Bop along with the band as they play tunes from 10 at Gebäude 9 Saturday.

Price: €15.65

Location: Gebäude 9, Deutz-Mülheimer-Str. 127-129

Times: Saturday, January 12, 9pm

Tickets: 0221 2801

More Information: www.gebaeude9.de

FRANKFURT

Comedy

FITS After Work Comedy Hour

My New Year’s resolution is to laugh more. Your’s too? Close your laptops and head to Orange Peel Wednesday night when improv actors from FITS (Frankfurt International Theatre Sports) goof around on stage for an hour (in English). Nice way to blow off some office steam. Have a good chuckle. And a drink too.

Price: €7

Location: Orange Peel
, Kaiserstrasse 39

Times: Wednesday, January 15, 7:30pm

Phone: 0152 5408 5537

More Information: www.tlsfrankfurt.com

HAMBURG

Circus Theatre

Cirkus Cirkör – Wear It Like a Crown

Six characters, each one wrestling with his or her own conundrums, create an absurd world of gothic fantasy in this Swedish circus show. Peppered with jovial circus tricks, the action takes place upon a revolving stage where eccentric performers try to communicate with each other through suction cups, ping pong balls, sparks, and cellophane. Their website says it’s “a show about wearing your fears and failures with pride.” A four week run starts Friday at Fliegende Bauten in Hamburg. See it and smile all the way home.

Price: €29.90 – 66.40

Location: Fliegende Bauten, Glacischaussee 4

Times: Friday, January 11 – Sunday, February 10; Daily, 8 pm; Sundays, 5pm

Tickets: 040 881 411 880

More Information: www.fliegende-bauten.de

Galleries/Museums

Nightmares and Ruined Angels – Hamburg Art From 1920 – 1950

The early twentieth century was a tough time for artists in Germany. Though tough times often breed great art. Historian Maike Bruhns is an expert on the subject, and she’s built up a nice cache of paintings by World War II era Hamburg artists. See eighty of them by the likes of Friedrich Ahlers-Hestermann, Eduard Bargheer, Ernst Barlach, Arnold Fiedler, and others brave enough to create works between 1920 and 1950. The exhibition opens Monday at Kunsthaus Hamburg.

Price: Free

Location: Kunsthaus Hamburg, Klosterwall 15

Times: Monday, January 14, 7pm (Opening); Tuesday – Sunday, 11am-6pm; through April 1

Phone: 040 33 58 03

More Information: www.kunsthaushamburg.de

LEIPZIG

Events

African Dinner at the Leipzig Zoo

Cozy up at the Kiwara Lodge at the Leipzig Zoo Friday night and enjoy an African feast. While you and your pals indulge in the exotic flavours of chickpea soup, mango Kingklip, and coconut curry rice, you’ll hear stories about the culture and traditions of the West African country Gambia. The evening culminates with a special tour into the giraffe house and the lion’s den.

Price: €70

Location: Leipzig Zoo, Kiwara Lodge, Pfaffendorfer Strasse 29

Times: Friday, January 11, 6pm-Midnight

Reservations: 0341 59 33 385

More Information: www.zoo-leipzig.de

MUNICH

Galleries/Museums

Prague Through the Lens of the Secret Police

Like their Eastern European commi pals, the former Czechoslovakia had its own secret police force. Known as the Statni bezpecnost or StB, the undercover agents kept a classified list of “hostile people” and tracked their “suspicious behaviour” by taking secret photographs. A selection of these clandestine images hang at a new exhibition in Munich, which opens Wednesday. If you liked The Lives of Others, you’ll love this.

Price: Free

Location: Tschechisches Zentrum, Prinzregentenstrasse 7

Times: Wednesday, January 16, 7pm (Opening); Monday – Wednesday, Friday, 10am-5pm; Thursday, 10am-7pm (through March 1)

Phone: 089 2102 4932

More Information: munich.czechcentres.cz

ECM – A Cultural Archaeology

Founded by Manfred Eicher in 1969, ECM is among the most lauded labels in the jazz genre. The Munich-based record label is the subject of a new exhibition at the Haus der Kunst that features recorded music, photographs, graphics, and rare concert footage including a film from a live performance by Keith Jarrett, Jan Garbarek, Palle Danielsson and Jon Christensen from the early 1970s. Get comfy at one of the listening stations and give your ears a treat. The Evan Parker Electro-Acoustic Quartet performs Friday as part of the show’s live concert series.

Price: €8

Location: Haus der Kunst,
Prinzregentenstrasse 1

Times: Monday – Sunday, 10am-8pm; Thursday, 10am-10pm; through February 10

Phone: 089 21127 113

More Information: www.hausderkunst.de

Events

Hochzeitstage

Getting married? Bavarian brides and grooms will find everything they need for the big day at the MOC Event Center this weekend when frothy white gowns, multi-tiered cakes, and jubilant floral arrangements go on display. Hochzeitstage is a one stop shop for all your wedding needs. Check everything from the DJ to the honeymoon off your list. Done and done. Now go get hitched!

Price: €12

Location: MOC, Halle 2 and Halle 3, Lilienthalallee 40

Times: Saturday, January 12 and Sunday, January 13, 11am-6pm

Phone: 089 419 6940

More Information: www.hochzeitstage.de

STUTTGART

Film

Jean-Pierre Gorin – “Poto and Cabengo”

Grace and Virginia Kennedy are American twins who spent their early childhoods with little social interaction. They communicated with each other in their own made up language, calling each other “Poto” and “Cabengo.” A fascinating story indeed. In 1979, the French filmmaker Jean-Pierre Gorin made a documentary film about the girls, which screens Thursday as part of the “Acts of Voicing” exhibition at the Württembergischer Kunstverein Stuttgart.

Price: €5

Location: Württembergischer Kunstverein Stuttgart, Schlossplatz 2

Times: Thursday, January 10, 7pm

Phone: 0711 22 33 70

More Information: www.wkv-stuttgart.de

INTEGRATION

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

“Berlin enabled me to become the kind of person I want to be,” Canadian Mo Moubarak tells us.

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?
Photo: Getty Images

 Produced by The Local’s Creative Studio in partnership with Berlin Partner for Business and Technology

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

“Berlin enabled me to become the kind of person I want to be,” says Canadian Mo Moubarak. It’s a sentiment that resonates with many international people who moved to the German capital to work in a vibrant atmosphere of innovation and progress.

From its thriving startup scene to its enviable cultural highlights, Berlin is one of the world’s most exciting cities – and, with the rare sense of freedom and opportunity it offers, the city continues to attract global talent during the pandemic.

Moubarak, one of the founders of the successful digital recruitment firm MoBerries, is effusive about the city he has made his home: “I came here as a 19-year-old with €3,000 in my pocket, and went on to run my own company. You know what makes this city incredible? Your word means everything – that’s what matters. Not your money.”

While living in Berlin is an unforgettable experience, that doesn’t mean it comes without its challenges for internationals, however. That’s why The Local has partnered with Berlin Partner for Business and Technology, the city’s public-private development partnership, to explore the experiences of three international people living and working in the German capital. 

From the level of English to digitalisation, we’re also inviting you to make your voice heard on how Berlin could become even more welcoming to new arrivals. 

Want to make Berlin an even better place for internationals? Take the 5-minute Talent Berlin Survey (one reader who completes it will win two years of free access to The Local Germany)

Photos: Getty Images

Hurdles and challenges

Problems securing accommodation, lack of clarity in regards to visas and long waiting times for appointments were some of the concerns voiced by Claire Waggoner, an American copywriter who moved to Berlin in 2019.

Although she loves life in the capital for its vibrancy and cultural heritage, she states: “Making the choice to move here was pretty much the only ‘easy’ thing about moving from the US to Germany. There were two major challenges: securing an apartment and getting the ‘letters of intent’ required for my freelancer’s visa.

“If I could have spoken with a government employee before my visa appointment, I would have been much more confident going into that initial appointment.”

Priyanka Nair, originally from India, came to Berlin in 2016 to study an MBA, before moving into HR. She says she faced similar challenges. 

“I could manage with the bureaucracy as I spoke German but wondered how those who couldn’t speak the language would manage,” she says. “Getting appointments with different agencies was difficult. I sat up late looking for appointments at government offices like the foreign or registration offices.

“Like for everyone, finding accommodation was the hardest part.”

Having said that, Priyanka is hugely enthusiastic about the city she now calls home and the opportunities to integrate by getting involved with group activities.

“Do you like Improv? There are meetups weekly. Want to stand up for a cause? There are various demonstrations you can participate in. Love sport? You can join any sports club or do a marathon. The point is, there is something for everyone here. You can be whoever you want.”

Create the Berlin you want to live and work in: take the Talent Berlin Survey (for every completed survey, Berlin Partner will plant a tree)

Share your views and experiences

The examples above are some of the hurdles that Berlin Partner – a partnership between the city government and local business – wants to learn more about. To reach out to the many internationals who have made the city their own, Berlin Partner has created the new Talent Berlin Survey.

The short, confidential survey gives you the chance to share your view of life in Berlin, so you can help shape and improve all the important aspects of the relocation and settling in process. It’s a unique opportunity to tell the state government how you think Berlin can become a more welcoming city for international newcomers like yourself.

“Berlin is the most international city in Germany, and it’s changing all the time,” says Burkhard Volbracht, Head of Unit Talent International at Berlin Partner. “From my experience, we’ve seen a lot of people come to Berlin in recent years – and the government thinks that they’re all settling in smoothly.

“We feel that this is the wrong picture. Some people do struggle and have problems, and they do need the right person to speak with, or the right door to open. What we at Berlin Partner want to identify are concrete points where we can be better – for example, language competencies or better digital services. We want to be able to roll out the red carpet, in a sense.

“We think that this is the first opportunity for those coming to Berlin to really tell us how they found moving to the city”.

Mo Moubarak
Claire Waggoner
Priyanka Nair

Shape Berlin’s future (in just five minutes!)

Have you moved to Berlin to work, or are you in the process of moving? Here’s your chance to help build the kind of city that suits both your career and lifestyle needs.

Spending five minutes to complete the survey will not only help build a friendlier, more inclusive German centre of innovation, but for every survey completed, Berlin Partner will plant a tree, contributing to sustainability efforts in the Berlin area.

The Local is also offering a two-year membership for one reader that completes the survey – that’s two years of insider insights, advice and explainers for life in Germany.

Want to help shape Berlin’s future in just 5 minutes? Take the Talent Berlin Survey. One lucky reader who completes the survey will receive two years of free access to The Local Germany

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