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CULTURE

‘Red Riding Hood and the wolf is an erotic story’

The first edition of Brothers Grimm fairytales was published 200 years ago on Thursday. The Local profiles the German brothers who changed children's bedtime forever - and gave Walt Disney a start in movies.

'Red Riding Hood and the wolf is an erotic story'
Photo: Die Brüder Grimm, Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Nationalgalerie

On December 20, 1812, the first edition of the Grimm brothers’ Children’s and Household Tales was published. Since that day, Red Riding Hood, Snow White, Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel and all the other characters have taken over the world – they were translated into 170 languages, and turned into five treacly Disney cartoons. And that original book, housed in the Brothers Grimm Museum in Kassel, Hesse, was declared a World Heritage document in 2005.

But why are these old folk tales about magic frogs and pumpkin coaches so popular? “Fairytales are the old stories of humanity,” said Holger Ehrhardt, a professor who specializes in the Brothers Grimm at Kassel University. “Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm tried to collect everything that relates to the old Germanic culture, and these stories reach back to the beginnings of our time. For example, you can find themes in the Grimm fairytales from old first-century Indian fables.”

He added that most of the stories point to a deeper meaning. “People have always told their children stories or myths for pedagogic reasons,” said Ehrhardt. “And often they offered adults an explanation for natural phenomena like thunder. Someone must have made that.”

The Grimm brothers, born in Hanau, Hesse, began their work in 1806 – though they didn’t start by roaming the countryside and eavesdropping on peasants’ talk. They simply wrote down the stories told by acquaintances. The first edition contains stories from the Wild and Hassenpflug families, while stories told to them by Dorothea Viehmann, a local tailor’s wife, were included in the second edition.

“The Grimms then changed these stories, and that’s how the Grimm fairytales came about,” said Ehrhardt.

But the original book was not a success. Horrific graphic details, combined with pedantic academic footnotes, did not exactly endear the books to younger readers. While Jacob was more interested in linguistic, political, and religious analysis, Wilhelm then re-worked the tales and gave them their characteristic sentimental style. “That was his most significant contribution,” said Bernhard Lauer, director of the Grimm museum.

“Evil mothers became evil step-mothers, naked princes were dressed up in fine clothes, and Rapunzel’s pregnancy was kept from both the evil witch and the well-disposed reader,” the website dedicated to the “Grimm Year” 2013 points out.

Some, like actor Ilja Richter, think the Grimms took too many of the double meanings out of the original folk tales. “Look at Red Riding Hood and the evil wolf,” he said. “That is a very erotic story. Or The Wolf and the Seven Young Goats. That’s just all exclusively about sex.” Also, Germany’s Family Minister Kristina Schröder this week dismissed some of the Grimm stories as “often sexist.”

Despite this year’s anniversary of the original book, 2013 has been dedicated as the “Grimm Year,” partly because it includes the 150th anniversaries of the deaths of Jacob (September 20) and the painter brother Ludwig Emil Grimm (April 4), who illustrated the second edition of the fairytales.

But, as Ehrhardt said, the brothers were also major linguists. “Compared to Goethe and Schiller, the Grimms get little attention,” he said, arguing that they initiated the study of Germanic culture, and pointing out that they began a German dictionary – even if they only made it to the word Frucht (fruit).

But they will forever be associated with the timeless tales that bear their name – even if only half of them, incidentally, begin with the phrase “Once upon a time…”

The Local/DPA/bk

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FOOD&DRINK

Five German drinks to try this summer

There’s nothing quite like a cold drink on a hot summer’s day and the Germans know it well. That’s why they’ve got a variety of tasty alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages to cool them down in the hottest months. Here are five you should try.

Five German drinks to try this summer

Summertime in Germany can get pretty hot, but thankfully there are plenty of popular drinks which can help you cool down, as well as tickle the tastebuds.

In Germany, fizzy water is wildly popular, so it’s not surprising that Sprudel is a key ingredient in most of the drinks on this list.

Hugo

A Hugo cocktail. Photo: Greta Farnedi/Unsplash

The Hugo is a cocktail made of Prosecco, elderflower syrup, mint leaves, a shot of mineral water and a slice of lime.

This refreshing alcoholic drink was invented by Roland Gruber, a bartender in South Tyrol, the mainly German-speaking region of northern Italy in 2005.

Though the drink wasn’t invented in Germany, it quickly spread across the borders of northern Italy and gained popularity here. Nowadays, you’ll be able to order a Hugo in pretty much any bar in the country.

Radler

A woman holds a pint of Radler. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Nicolas Armer

One of the best-known and most popular mixed beer drinks is the Radler: a concoction of beer and lemonade, a bit like a British shandy. In some areas of Germany – particularly in the south – the mixture is called Alster.

Usually, the ratio is 60 percent beer and 40 percent lemonade, but there are also some interesting variants. In some regions of Germany, a distinction is made between sweet (with lemonade) and sour (with water) Radler. Some foolhardy drinkers even mix their beer with cola (called a diesel).

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: The German regions producing the most important beer ingredient

Apfelschorle

A woman pours apple spritz into plastic cups. Photo: picture alliance / dpa | Soeren Stache

Apfelschorle is an absolute German classic.

The traditional mix of apple juice and fizzy water is a 1:1 ratio, but if you’re making the drink at home you can adjust the measurements to your liking. 

The concept of Saftschorle (fruit spritzer) has moved way beyond the plain old apple in Germany though. On Supermarket shelves, you’ll find major drinks chains offering a wide variety of fizzy fruit beverages, including  Rhabarbe-Schorle (Rhubarb spritz), Schwarze Johannisbeer-Schorle (Black currant spritz) and Holunderschorle (elderberry spritz).

Berliner Weiße mit Schuss

A woman drinks a Berliner Weiße in Berlin.

A woman drinks a Berliner Weiße in Berlin. Photo: picture alliance / dpa | Britta Pedersen

The Berliner Weiße (or Weisse) is an old, German beer, brewed with barley and wheat malt.

As the name suggests, it originates from the German capital, where it was extremely popular in the 19th century and was celebrated as the “Champagne of the North”.

But by the end of the 19th century, sour beer styles, including this one, became increasingly unpopular and they almost died out completely. 

READ ALSO: Five German foods that aren’t what you think they are

So people started mixing the drink with sweet syrup. This gave rise to the trend of drinking Berliner Weissbier with a shot (Schuss) of raspberry or woodruff syrup, which is still widely enjoyed today. Some breweries even ferment fruits such as raspberries or strawberries.

The drink is so well-known in Germany, that there was even a TV series named after it which ran for 10 years 1984 to 1995.

Weinschorle

Water and wine in equal parts and both well chilled – a light summer drink. Photo: picture alliance / dpa-tmn | DWI

Another fizzy-water-based German classic is the white wine spritz. 

A wine spritzer is a refreshing drink on warm summer days which has the advantage of not going to your head as quickly as a regular glass of wine. With equal parts fizzy water and wine, the drink has only about 5-6 percent alcohol, compared to glass of pure white wine, which has about 9-14 percent. 

For optimum German-ness when making this drink at home, choose a German white wine such as Müller-Thurgau, Silvaner or Riesling.

Enjoy and drink responsibly!

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