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What’s on in Germany: January 26 – February 1

This Week's Highlights: Hitchcock in Frankfurt, indie rock in Munich, and an homage to an electronic music pioneer in Berlin.

What's on in Germany: January 26 – February 1
Photo: Hitchcock's North by Northwest at Frankfurt's Pupille cinema.

BERLIN

Music/Concerts

CTM Festival – Portrait of Eliane Radigue

Few woman have been as influential in the world of electronic music as French composer Eliane Radigue. Forty years ago, she worked primarily with the ARP synthesizer, her signature instrument. But today, the octogenarian writes predominantly for acoustic instruments. See the electroacoustic pioneer talk on Tuesday following Monday’s performance of her piece “Naldjorlak,” which opens CTM 12 Festival for Adventurous Music and Related Visual Arts.

Price: €7-18

Location: HAU 1, Stresemannstrasse 29

Times: Monday, January 30, 7:30; Tuesday, January 31, 5pm and 7:30

More Information: www.ctm-festival.de

Galleries/Museums

Ryoji Ikeda – DB

“Sine waves, sound pulses, pixels of light and numerical data” are the building blocks of Japanese artist Ryoji Ikeda. For his first solo exhibition in Germany, he’s linked the two symmetrical halls at the Hamburger Bahnhof’s east and west wings with wondrous technicality. Take in all that digital black and white beauty starting Saturday.

Price: €12

Location: Hamburger Bahnhof, Invalidenstrasse 50-51


Times: Tuesday – Friday 10am-6pm; Saturday, 11am-8pm; Sunday, 11am-6pm; January 28 – April 9

Phone: 030 3978 3411

More Information: www.hamburgerbahnhof.de

Dance

Hofesh Shechter Company – Political Mother: The Choreographer’s Cut

It’s no wonder Hofesh Shechter’s dance works have the air of a rock show. The choreographer was a rock drummer before trading in his drum sticks for a pair of dancing shoes. In “Political Mother” 16 dancers spin and leap to the music of a live 20-member band. Get a load of the raucous onstage action this weekend in Berlin.

Price: €12 – 39

Location: Haus der Berliner Festspiele, Schaperstrasse 24

Times: Friday, January 27 and Saturday, January 28, 8pm

More Information: www.politicalmother.co.uk

COLOGNE

Film

Before the Law Film Series – The End and The Savage Eye

It’s the last day in the lives of six people in Christopher MacLaine’s 35-minute film The End. A San Francisco beat poet during the 1940s and 1950s, MacLaine only made a handful of films. See this one, along with The Savage Eye (1959) a dramatized documentary that follows the life of a divorced man, when they screen Thursday at Museum Ludwig.

Price: €5

Times: Thursday, January 26, 8pm

Location: Museum Ludwig, Heinrich-Böll-Platz

More Information: www.museum-ludwig.de

DÜSSELDORF

Events

Toykio x NRW Forum Pop-Up Store

Forget about My Little Pony. Toykio’s Unicorno Minis are where it’s at. Stock up on Japanese monster toys when the Toykio Pop-Up Store opens at NRW-Forum. DJ Rafik spins at Friday night’s opening party while artists like Flying Förtress, Max Fiedler and the Majo Bros mingle with the crowd.

Price: €5.80

Times: Tuesday – Sunday, 11am-8pm; Friday, 11am-midnight (Regular Hours); Friday, January 27, 7:30pm-midnight (Opening Party)

Location: NRW-Forum Kultur, 
Ehrenhof 2

Phone: 0211 89 266 90

More Information: www.nrw-forum.de

FRANKFURT

Film

Alfred Hitchcock – North by Northwest

The master of cinematic suspense released his thrilling tale of mistaken identity in 1959. Watch Carey Grant scale Mount Rushmore, high-tale it across the desert, and fall into the arms of his co-star Eva Marie Saint in Hitchcock’s classic North by Northwest when it hits the big screen at Pupille Cinema Thursday.

Price: €2.50

Times: Thursday, January 26, 8:30pm

Location: Pupille, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Mertonstrasse 26–28

Phone: 069 79 82 89 76

More Information: www.pupille.org

HANNOVER

Galleries/Museums/Concerts

Cool Katz – Alex Katz: Naked Beauty and The Lars Stoermer Quartet

Clear lines and broad planes of colour characterize New York artist Alex Katz’s work. An individual among the abstract expressionists of the 1950s, his oversized portraits earned him world renown. See his big nudes and New York City scenes at the Kestner Society Thursday when The Lars Stoermer Quartet plays original tunes and cool jazz classics.

Price: €7

Location: Kestner Gesellschaft, Goseriede 11

Times: Thursday, January 26, 7-9pm

Phone: 0511 70 1200

More Information: www.kestnergesellschaft.de

MUNICH

Music/Concerts

Dear Reader

Cherilyn MacNeill has one of those clear, sparkly voices you can’t help but love. On the heels of her latest record Idealistic Animals, the Berlin-based, South African musician is skipping around Europe with her band. She sings, plays keyboards, guitar, and has been known to cover The Boss. Catch her Sunday in Munich.

Price: €15

Location: Atomic Café, Neuturmstrasse 5

Times: Sunday, January 29 9pm

Phone: 089 522 83 054

More Information: www.atomic.de

Galleries/Museums

George Stubbs

If you were an 18th century English aristocrat with a horse or a hound, you would have had George Stubbs over with his palette and paint brushes. Renowned for his animal portraiture, the artist’s graceful pictures of mares and foals are truly sublime. Works from the Royal Collection, the Tate Britain, and castles from across Great Britain join pieces from the Neue Pinakothek’s own collection in a new exhibition that starts Thursday.

Price: €10

Location: Alte Pinakothek, 
Barer Strasse 27

Times: Thursday – Monday, 10am-6pm; Wednesday, 10am-8pm; January 26 – May 6

Phone: 089 2380 5216

More Information: www.pinakothek.de

Dave Jordano – Detroit Unbroken Down

With all the focus on Detroit’s down and out side, It’s nice to see someone turning their lens toward some of the city’s bright spots. Detroit photographer Dave Jordano profiles the bits of urban renewal popping up across Motor City in a new exhibition at Amerika Haus in Munich. Check out the community gardens, street art, and creative independent businesses he’s captured with his camera.

Price: Free

Location: Amerika Haus, Karolinenplatz 3

Times: Monday – Friday, noon-5pm; Wednesday, noon-8pm; through March 30

Phone: 089 5525 3713

More Information: www.amerikahaus.de

WOLFSBURG

Galleries/Museums

The Art of Deceleration – Motion and Rest in Art from Casper David Friedrich to Ai Weiwei

Nam June Paik’s “Brandenburg Gate,” one of Auguste Rodin’s pondering nudes, and Jonathan Schipper’s installation involving a Chevy Camaro and a Plymouth Duster are a few of the pieces you’ll see at the Wolfsburg Art Museum. The current exhibition examines notions of motion and rest in art. Go on Friday and stay for “Eat & Art.” For an extra €42, you get a four-course gourmet meal.

Price: €8; €42 (Eat & Art)

Location: Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg
 Hollerplatz 1

Times: Wednesday – Sunday, 11am-6pm; Tuesday, 11am-8pm; through April 9; Friday, January 27, 6:30pm (Eat & Art)

Phone: 05361 26690

More Information: www.kunstmuseum-wolfsburg.de

INTEGRATION

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

“Berlin enabled me to become the kind of person I want to be,” Canadian Mo Moubarak tells us.

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?
Photo: Getty Images

 Produced by The Local’s Creative Studio in partnership with Berlin Partner for Business and Technology

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

Have your say: How would YOU shape Berlin?

“Berlin enabled me to become the kind of person I want to be,” says Canadian Mo Moubarak. It’s a sentiment that resonates with many international people who moved to the German capital to work in a vibrant atmosphere of innovation and progress.

From its thriving startup scene to its enviable cultural highlights, Berlin is one of the world’s most exciting cities – and, with the rare sense of freedom and opportunity it offers, the city continues to attract global talent during the pandemic.

Moubarak, one of the founders of the successful digital recruitment firm MoBerries, is effusive about the city he has made his home: “I came here as a 19-year-old with €3,000 in my pocket, and went on to run my own company. You know what makes this city incredible? Your word means everything – that’s what matters. Not your money.”

While living in Berlin is an unforgettable experience, that doesn’t mean it comes without its challenges for internationals, however. That’s why The Local has partnered with Berlin Partner for Business and Technology, the city’s public-private development partnership, to explore the experiences of three international people living and working in the German capital. 

From the level of English to digitalisation, we’re also inviting you to make your voice heard on how Berlin could become even more welcoming to new arrivals. 

Want to make Berlin an even better place for internationals? Take the 5-minute Talent Berlin Survey (one reader who completes it will win two years of free access to The Local Germany)

Photos: Getty Images

Hurdles and challenges

Problems securing accommodation, lack of clarity in regards to visas and long waiting times for appointments were some of the concerns voiced by Claire Waggoner, an American copywriter who moved to Berlin in 2019.

Although she loves life in the capital for its vibrancy and cultural heritage, she states: “Making the choice to move here was pretty much the only ‘easy’ thing about moving from the US to Germany. There were two major challenges: securing an apartment and getting the ‘letters of intent’ required for my freelancer’s visa.

“If I could have spoken with a government employee before my visa appointment, I would have been much more confident going into that initial appointment.”

Priyanka Nair, originally from India, came to Berlin in 2016 to study an MBA, before moving into HR. She says she faced similar challenges. 

“I could manage with the bureaucracy as I spoke German but wondered how those who couldn’t speak the language would manage,” she says. “Getting appointments with different agencies was difficult. I sat up late looking for appointments at government offices like the foreign or registration offices.

“Like for everyone, finding accommodation was the hardest part.”

Having said that, Priyanka is hugely enthusiastic about the city she now calls home and the opportunities to integrate by getting involved with group activities.

“Do you like Improv? There are meetups weekly. Want to stand up for a cause? There are various demonstrations you can participate in. Love sport? You can join any sports club or do a marathon. The point is, there is something for everyone here. You can be whoever you want.”

Create the Berlin you want to live and work in: take the Talent Berlin Survey (for every completed survey, Berlin Partner will plant a tree)

Share your views and experiences

The examples above are some of the hurdles that Berlin Partner – a partnership between the city government and local business – wants to learn more about. To reach out to the many internationals who have made the city their own, Berlin Partner has created the new Talent Berlin Survey.

The short, confidential survey gives you the chance to share your view of life in Berlin, so you can help shape and improve all the important aspects of the relocation and settling in process. It’s a unique opportunity to tell the state government how you think Berlin can become a more welcoming city for international newcomers like yourself.

“Berlin is the most international city in Germany, and it’s changing all the time,” says Burkhard Volbracht, Head of Unit Talent International at Berlin Partner. “From my experience, we’ve seen a lot of people come to Berlin in recent years – and the government thinks that they’re all settling in smoothly.

“We feel that this is the wrong picture. Some people do struggle and have problems, and they do need the right person to speak with, or the right door to open. What we at Berlin Partner want to identify are concrete points where we can be better – for example, language competencies or better digital services. We want to be able to roll out the red carpet, in a sense.

“We think that this is the first opportunity for those coming to Berlin to really tell us how they found moving to the city”.

Mo Moubarak
Claire Waggoner
Priyanka Nair

Shape Berlin’s future (in just five minutes!)

Have you moved to Berlin to work, or are you in the process of moving? Here’s your chance to help build the kind of city that suits both your career and lifestyle needs.

Spending five minutes to complete the survey will not only help build a friendlier, more inclusive German centre of innovation, but for every survey completed, Berlin Partner will plant a tree, contributing to sustainability efforts in the Berlin area.

The Local is also offering a two-year membership for one reader that completes the survey – that’s two years of insider insights, advice and explainers for life in Germany.

Want to help shape Berlin’s future in just 5 minutes? Take the Talent Berlin Survey. One lucky reader who completes the survey will receive two years of free access to The Local Germany

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