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POLICE

Cops charged for removal of ‘cocky’ man

Two police officers are facing charges for forcing a man they claim was acting "cocky" into a police vehicle in central Stockholm and dropping him on the outskirts of town even though he had done nothing illegal.

Cops charged for removal of 'cocky' man

The charges stem from an incident in June as Ibrahim Assali, 41, was leaving an eatery in central Stockholm, when suddenly a police van pulled up behind him, the Aftonbladet newspaper reported.

The two police officers who stepped out of the van asked him a number of questions, which Assali answered with “no comment”.

Assali responded “sarcastically” when asked if he was carrying any sharp objects, telling police he had “tons”.

Even though police didn’t find anything illegal in his possession after frisking him, they forced Assali in the van and removed him from the area.

“They told me they would drive me home. One of them asked if I had a bus card. When I said I didn’t she just smiled and drove off,” Assali told the newspaper.

The officers drove Assali to the Kaknäs Tower outside of Stockholm and left him there, five kilometres from his home.

Now the two officers have been charged with deprivation of liberty with an alternative charge of professional misconduct.

“It is the way we’ve been trained,” one of the officers during questioning, adding that the radio-and-TV tower outside downtown Stockholm is generally known among police officers as a good spot to drop troublesome people.

Benny Henriksen, officer in command at the station, didn’t want to comment on the officers’ claims that they were following standard procedures, but told

Aftonbladet that they have the right to remove people from an area, and that it would be pointless to drop someone off close to the site.

Four police cadets also participated in removing the man, but won’t be reported since the other two were in charge of the operation.

Both of them, 27 and 31 years old respectively, claim their actions were appropriate and that the man was removed because he was “cocky” and that he posed a potential danger to public order.

Assali is happy to see the two officers are now being charged, however, disputing claims that he was aggressive at the time of the incident.

“That’s bullshit,” he said.

“Why would I report them if I acted as terribly as they said I did. This is abuse of power. I feel damn violated and mistreated. Had I been blond with blue eyes they wouldn’t have done this.”

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POLICE

Two mountaineers killed and 9 injured in ice fall in Swiss mountains

A Frenchwoman and a Spaniard were killed and nine other mountaineers were injured on Friday in an ice fall in southwest Switzerland, police said following a rescue attempt involving several helicopters.

Two mountaineers killed and 9 injured in ice fall in Swiss mountains

Police received calls at 6.20 am reporting that mountaineers had been caught up in falling seracs — columns of glacial ice formed by crevasses — on the Grand Combin, a glacial massif near the Italian border in the Wallis region.

Seven helicopters with mountain rescue experts flew to the scene, finding 17 mountaineers split among several groups.

“Two people died at the scene of the accident,” Wallis police said in a statement. They were a 40-year-old Frenchwoman and a 65-year-old man from Spain.

Nine mountaineers were airlifted to hospitals in nearby Sion and in Lausanne. Two of them are seriously injured, police said.

Other mountaineers were evacuated by helicopter.

The regional public prosecutor has opened an investigation “to determine the circumstances of this event”, the police said.

The serac fall happened at an altitude of 3,400 metres in the Plateau de Dejeuner section along the Voie du Gardien ascent route.

The Grand Combin massif has three summits above 4,000 metres, the highest of which is the Combin de Grafeneire at 4,314 metres.

The police issued a note of caution about setting off on such high-altitude expeditions.

“When the zero-degree-Celsius isotherm is around 4,000 metres above sea level, it is better to be extra careful or not attempt the route if in doubt,” Wallis police said.

“The golden rule is to find out beforehand from the mountain guides about the chosen route and its current feasibility.”

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